All posts by blackhistory938

Raw data SHORT summary DNA

Population
Amerindian
Ancestral_Altaic
South_Central_Asian
Arctic
South_Indian
Australoid
Austronesian
Caucasian
Archaic_Human 0.33 Pct
East_African 0.98 Pct
East_Siberian
European_Early_Farmers
Khoisan 0.90 Pct
Melano_Polynesian
Archaic_African 19.79 Pct
Near_East 0.38 Pct
North_African 2.08 Pct
Paleo_Siberian
African_Pygmy
South_East_Asian
Subsaharian 72.14 Pct
Tungus-Altaic
European_Hunters_Gatherers 3.40 Pct

Admix Results (sorted):

# Population Percent
1 Subsaharian 72.14
2 Archaic_African 19.79
3 European_Hunters_Gatherers 3.40
4 North_African 2.08

Using 1 population approximation:
1 African_Caribbean_ @ 3.462261
2 Damara_ @ 5.895049
3 Himba_ @ 6.028249
4 Wambo_ @ 6.198729
5 Bantu_SA_Ovambo_ @ 6.223861
6 Mende_Sierra_Leone_MSL_ @ 6.341632
7 Bamoun_ @ 6.458725
8 Fang_ @ 6.520264
9 Bantu_SA_Herero_ @ 6.640144
10 Kaba_ @ 6.865306
11 Gambian_GWD_ @ 7.250533
12 Brong_ @ 7.253956
13 Hausa_ @ 7.692444
14 Igbo_ @ 7.875316
15 Mandenka_ @ 8.394191
16 Bambaran_ @ 8.850101
17 Esan_Nigeria_ESN_ @ 9.127226
18 AA_Denver_ @ 9.292484
19 Yoruba_ @ 9.327624
20 Dogon_ @ 10.601250

MY YORUBA HERITAGE

Population
Ancestral_North_Eurasian 1.76 Pct
Ancestral_South_Eurasian 0.76 Pct
East_Asian
West_European_Hunter_Gartherer 2.39 Pct
Natufian 1.95 Pct
Sub_Saharan

Admix Results (sorted):

 

# Population Percent
1 Sub_Saharan 93.13
2 West_European_Hunter_Gartherer 2.39
3 Natufian 1.95
4 Ancestral_North_Eurasian 1.76
5 Ancestral_South_Eurasian 0.76


Single Population Sharing:

 

# Population (source) Distance
1 Gambian 4.77
2 Esan 8.16
3 Yoruba 8.16
4 Mota 12.59
5 Hadza 14.06
6 Masai 27.1
7 Somali 49.08
8 Moroccan 84.37
9 Saharawi 85.73
10 Algerian 87.94
11 Yemeni 94.4
12 Libyan 94.75
13 Egyptian 97.91
14 GoyetQ116 101.79
15 BedouinA 103.97
16 Jordanian 106.72
17 Syrian 107.67
18 Palestinian 107.97
19 Steppe_IA 109.71
20 Turkmen 109.76


Mixed Mode Population Sharing:

 

# Primary Population (source) Secondary Population (source) Distance
1 96% Gambian + 4% Steppe_Eneolithic @ 0.67
2 96% Gambian + 4% Steppe_EMBA @ 0.71
3 93.2% Yoruba + 6.8% Steppe_MLBA @ 0.8
4 93.2% Esan + 6.8% Steppe_MLBA @ 0.8
5 96% Gambian + 4% Steppe_MLBA @ 0.89
6 93.3% Yoruba + 6.7% Ukrainian @ 1.07
7 93.3% Esan + 6.7% Ukrainian @ 1.07
8 95.9% Gambian + 4.1% Steppe_IA @ 1.07
9 93.3% Esan + 6.7% Russian @ 1.11
10 93.3% Yoruba + 6.7% Russian @ 1.11
11 93.4% Yoruba + 6.6% Norwegian @ 1.11
12 93.4% Esan + 6.6% Norwegian @ 1.11
13 96% Gambian + 4% Russian @ 1.12
14 96.1% Gambian + 3.9% Estonian @ 1.13
15 96% Gambian + 4% Finnish @ 1.13
16 96.1% Gambian + 3.9% Lithuanian @ 1.13
17 93.4% Yoruba + 6.6% Hungarian @ 1.14
18 93.4% Esan + 6.6% Hungarian @ 1.14
19 93.4% Yoruba + 6.6% Scottish @ 1.14
20 93.4% Esan + 6.6% Scottish @ 1.14

Igbo DNA

Admix Results (sorted):

# Population Percent
1 W_Benue_Congo 58.89
2 E_Benue_Congo 25.56
3 Western_Semitic 5.12
4 Omotic 2.47
5 Southern_HG 2.39
6 Eastern_HG 2.17
7 Ubangian_Congo 1.93
8 Nilo_Saharan 1.47

Single Population Sharing:

# Population (source) Distance
1 Nigeria_Hausa 5.73
2 Mali_Mandinka 5.89
3 Nigeria_Igbo 8.73
4 Cameroon_Bamoun 11.82
5 DRC_Kongo 11.93
6 Nigeria_Yoruba 13.14
7 Chad_Kaba 13.76
8 Ghana_Brong 15.17
9 Cameroon_Fang 17.89
10 Mali_Bambaran 18.03
11 SA_Nguni 23.74
12 SA_Pedi 24.95
13 Cameroon_Mada 25.74
14 Kenyan_Bantu 27.03
15 SA_Bantu 30.57
16 SA_Sotho/Tswana 31.32
17 Mali_Dogon 33.95
18 SA_Xhosa 35.58
19 Nigeria_Fulani 36.38
20 Kenyan_Luhya 42.86

Mixed Mode Population Sharing:

# Primary Population (source) Secondary Population (source) Distance
1 87.4% Nigeria_Igbo + 12.6% Tanzania_Sandawe @ 2.48
2 81.9% Nigeria_Yoruba + 18.1% Tanzania_Sandawe @ 2.86
3 88.3% Nigeria_Hausa + 11.7% Nigeria_Fulani @ 3.14
4 94.7% Nigeria_Hausa + 5.3% S_Moroccan @ 3.28
5 95.3% Nigeria_Hausa + 4.7% Mozabite @ 3.46
6 95.8% Nigeria_Hausa + 4.2% Egyptian @ 3.47
7 95.6% Nigeria_Hausa + 4.4% N_Moroccan @ 3.5
8 95.6% Nigeria_Hausa + 4.4% Tunisian @ 3.5
9 95.5% Nigeria_Hausa + 4.5% Libyan @ 3.51
10 95.5% Nigeria_Hausa + 4.5% Algerian @ 3.61
11 76.5% Ghana_Brong + 23.5% DRC_Hema @ 3.89
12 51.3% Nigeria_Hausa + 48.7% Mali_Mandinka @ 4
13 95.1% Nigeria_Hausa + 4.9% Ethiopian_Tygray @ 4.16
14 86.1% Nigeria_Igbo + 13.9% DRC_Hema @ 4.18
15 73.1% Mali_Mandinka + 26.9% DRC_Kongo @ 4.21
16 81% Mali_Mandinka + 19% Cameroon_Fang @ 4.26
17 95.2% Nigeria_Hausa + 4.8% Ethiopian_Amhara @ 4.27
18 95.3% Nigeria_Hausa + 4.7% Ethiopian_Afar @ 4.34
19 76.5% Nigeria_Igbo + 23.5% SA_Pedi @ 4.35
20 75.6% Nigeria_Igbo + 24.4% SA_Nguni @ 4.43

Akan DNA

Population Percent
1 Subsaharian 72.14
2 Archaic_African 19.79
3 European_Hunters_Gatherers 3.4
4 North_African 2.08
5 East_African 0.98
6 Khoisan 0.9
7 Near_East 0.38
8 Archaic_Human 0.33

Single Population Sharing:

# Population (source) Distance
1 African_Caribbean ( ) 4.05
2 Himba ( ) 4.59
3 Damara ( ) 4.65
4 Wambo ( ) 4.72
5 Bantu_SA_Ovambo ( ) 4.72
6 Mende_Sierra_Leone_MSL ( ) 4.98
7 Fang ( ) 5.03
8 Bamoun ( ) 5.07
9 Bantu_SA_Herero ( ) 5.31
10 Kaba ( ) 5.63
11 Gambian_GWD ( ) 5.96
12 Brong ( ) 5.96
13 Hausa ( ) 6.43
14 Igbo ( ) 6.62
15 Mandenka ( ) 7.12
16 Bambaran ( ) 7.59
17 Esan_Nigeria_ESN ( ) 7.88
18 Yoruba ( ) 8.08
19 AA_Denver ( ) 9.07
20 Dogon ( ) 9.3

Mixed Mode Population Sharing:

# Primary Population (source) Secondary Population (source) Distance
1 94.6% Mende_Sierra_Leone_MSL ( ) + 5.4% Saharawi ( ) @ 1.66
2 94.4% Mende_Sierra_Leone_MSL ( ) + 5.6% Morocco_South ( ) @ 1.66
3 94.7% Mende_Sierra_Leone_MSL ( ) + 5.3% Berber_WGA ( ) @ 1.67
4 94.4% Mende_Sierra_Leone_MSL ( ) + 5.6% Moroccan ( ) @ 1.79
5 94.3% Mende_Sierra_Leone_MSL ( ) + 5.7% Algerian ( ) @ 1.79
6 94.4% Mende_Sierra_Leone_MSL ( ) + 5.6% Tunisian ( ) @ 1.87
7 94.5% Mende_Sierra_Leone_MSL ( ) + 5.5% Shaigi_Sudan ( ) @ 1.91
8 94.7% Mende_Sierra_Leone_MSL ( ) + 5.3% Amhara ( ) @ 2.16
9 95.5% Mende_Sierra_Leone_MSL ( ) + 4.5% Mozabite ( ) @ 2.17
10 93.5% Brong ( ) + 6.5% Morocco_South ( ) @ 2.18
11 94.8% Bamoun ( ) + 5.2% Berber_WGA ( ) @ 2.2
12 94.8% Bamoun ( ) + 5.2% Saharawi ( ) @ 2.21
13 94.6% Bamoun ( ) + 5.4% Morocco_South ( ) @ 2.22
14 93.8% Brong ( ) + 6.2% Berber_WGA ( ) @ 2.26
15 93.3% Brong ( ) + 6.7% Algerian ( ) @ 2.27
16 93.8% Brong ( ) + 6.2% Saharawi ( ) @ 2.27
17 93.4% Brong ( ) + 6.6% Moroccan ( ) @ 2.29
18 94.4% Bamoun ( ) + 5.6% Algerian ( ) @ 2.3
19 94.5% Bamoun ( ) + 5.5% Moroccan ( ) @ 2.31
20 93.4% Brong ( ) + 6.6% Tunisian ( ) @ 2.32
Population
Amerindian
Ancestral_Altaic
South_Central_Asian
Arctic
South_Indian
Australoid
Austronesian
Caucasian
Archaic_Human 0.33 Pct
East_African 0.98 Pct
East_Siberian
European_Early_Farmers
Khoisan 0.90 Pct
Melano_Polynesian
Archaic_African 19.79 Pct
Near_East 0.38 Pct
North_African 2.08 Pct
Paleo_Siberian
African_Pygmy
South_East_Asian
Subsaharian 72.14 Pct
Tungus-Altaic
European_Hunters_Gatherers 3.40 Pct
 

IGBO DNA


Admix Results (sorted):

 

# Population Percent
1 W_Africa 62.66
2 S_Africa 13.82
3 Biaka 10.03
4 E_Africa 5.47
5 Europe 3.73
6 NW_Africa 1.80
7 San 1.50

——————————-

Population Percent
1 W_Africa 62.66
2 S_Africa 13.82
3 Biaka 10.03
4 E_Africa 5.47
5 Europe 3.73
6 NW_Africa 1.8
7 San 1.5
8 SW_Asia 0.99

0
Single Population Sharing:

# Population (source) Distance
1 Bamoun 7.08
2 Kongo 7.38
3 Fang 8.17
4 Hausa 13.78
5 Kaba 14.01
6 Igbo 14.81
7 Yoruba 16.09
8 Brong 19.52
9 Luhya 22.11
10 Mada 23.01
11 Bantu_N.E. 25.06
12 Mandenka 25.98
13 Fulani 34.21
14 Bulala 40.28
15 Maasai 63.26
16 Morocco_S 64.66
17 Xhosa 68.69
18 HADZA 71.75
19 SANDAWE 72.16
20 Algeria 72.26

Mixed Mode Population Sharing:

# Primary Population (source) Secondary Population (source) Distance
1 94.5% Bamoun + 5.5% North_Italian @ 4.15
2 93.8% Bamoun + 6.2% Morocco_Jews @ 4.18
3 94.4% Bamoun + 5.6% Tuscan @ 4.19
4 94% Bamoun + 6% North_African_Jews (Dodecad) @ 4.38
5 93.1% Bamoun + 6.9% North_African (Dodecad) @ 4.4
6 95.6% Bamoun + 4.4% French_Basque @ 4.53
7 93.7% Bamoun + 6.3% Egypt @ 4.74
8 93.2% Bamoun + 6.8% Algeria @ 4.76
9 93.9% Bamoun + 6.1% Morocco_N @ 4.79
10 93.7% Bamoun + 6.3% Egyptans @ 4.81
11 94.6% Bamoun + 5.4% Druze @ 4.81
12 93.3% Bamoun + 6.7% Libya @ 4.81
13 94.4% Bamoun + 5.6% Jordanians @ 4.89
14 93.6% Bamoun + 6.4% Ethiopians @ 4.89
15 93.7% Bamoun + 6.3% East_African (Dodecad) @ 4.91
16 93.7% Bamoun + 6.3% Ethiopian_Jews @ 4.92
17 93.4% Bamoun + 6.6% SANDAWE @ 4.94
18 93.5% Bamoun + 6.5% HADZA @ 5.08
19 92.7% Bamoun + 7.3% Maasai @ 5.08
20 93.9% Bamoun + 6.1% Moroccans @ 5.22

Least-squares method.

Using 1 population approximation:
1 Kongo @ 7.199489
2 Bamoun @ 7.368641
3 Fang @ 8.401048
4 Kaba @ 14.992677
5 Hausa @ 15.164440
6 Igbo @ 16.355167
7 Yoruba @ 17.843807
8 Brong @ 21.564810
9 Luhya @ 24.727180
10 Mada @ 25.271696
11 Bantu_N.E. @ 27.949913
12 Mandenka @ 28.462994
13 Bantu_S.E._Pedi @ 32.515762
14 Fulani @ 35.185699
15 Bantu_S.E._S.Sotho @ 43.762341
16 Bulala @ 45.141800
17 Morocco_S @ 68.555786
18 Maasai @ 71.156303
19 Xhosa @ 72.576920
20 Algeria @ 77.018028

My Black History Story Includes African Civilizations. — ShaRhonda Tribune

Growing up, I was starved for accurate information in schools about who I am. I ached to hear stories about people who look like me, or see the names of Black scholars in math or science, or even to talk about Africa, without talking about poverty and slavery. One of the hardest parts of the […]

via My Black History Story Includes African Civilizations. — ShaRhonda Tribune

Rudolf Douala Manga Bell: One of Cameroon’s first Resistant — African Heritage

Today, I would like to talk about one of the heroes of Cameroonian history, Rudolf Douala Manga Bell, who stood against the Germans in the 1910s in Kamerun. His courage, and strong determination earned him the right of martyr and hero in the history of the Douala (or Duala) people, and thus of Cameroon. Rudolf […]

via Rudolf Douala Manga Bell: One of Cameroon’s first Resistant — African Heritage

Analysing my raw data: Akan, Ga Igbo Yoruba Esan Hausa Palestinian ancient DNA Western Semetic

My first ancestry DNA analysis

Estimate

Benin/Togo
40%
Cameroon, Congo, and Southern Bantu Peoples
22%
Ivory Coast/Ghana
12%
Africa Southeastern Bantu
10%
Nigeria
7%
Iberian Peninsula
2%
Senegal
2%
Mali
2%
England, Wales & Northwestern Europe
1%
Ireland/Scotland/Wales
1%
Europe East
1%
The updated version

Ethnicity Estimate

Benin/Togo 49%

Cameroon, Congo, and Southern Bantu Peoples 34%

Ivory Coast/Ghana 11%

England, Wales & Northwestern Europe 5%

Mali 1%

 

DNA land  analyses my DNA data like this
West African 90% Lower Niger Valley 74%
Senegal River Valley 12%
Mende/Akan 4.1%
West Eurasian 7.8% Balkan 5.2%
Northwest European 2.6%
Ambiguous 2.3%

Ged match goes further back in ancestry, below my high results.

Population Europe NW_Africa SW_Asia E_Africa S_Africa Mbuti W_Africa Biaka San
Bantu_S.E._Zulu 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 100.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Bantu_S.W._Herero 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 100.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Bantu_S.W._Ovambo 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 100.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Biaka_Pygmies 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.80 0.10 0.20 98.60 0.30
Igbo 0.30 0.40 0.80 1.50 11.30 2.10 77.00 5.40 1.20
Hausa 0.50 1.60 0.50 4.10 11.19 1.30 75.92 4.40 0.50
North_Italian 73.10 2.20 24.70 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Mozabite 6.00 77.90 4.30 1.30 1.80 0.70 5.30 1.90 0.80
Yemen_Jews 19.82 2.30 74.37 2.00 0.50 0.20 0.00 0.30 0.50
Saudis 15.90 1.00 77.70 1.80 0.90 0.60 1.30 0.40 0.40
French_Basque 99.00 0.30 0.70 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Mandenka 0.20 4.20 0.90 0.20 1.40 1.30 86.20 2.80 2.80
TUNISIA 11.89 78.22 6.59 1.00 0.50 0.40 0.20 0.60 0.60

Lower Niger Valley

Includes: Yoruba and Esan in Nigeria and Yoruba in (Nigeria)

Yoruba Tribe – Lower Niger Valley

 

More of my Gedmatch results

Population
North_Atlantic 2.47 Pct
Baltic 2.44 Pct
West_Med 0.72 Pct
West_Asian
East_Med 0.79 Pct
Red_Sea 0.70 Pct
South_Asian 0.35 Pct
East_Asian 0.23 Pct
Siberian
Amerindian 0.11 Pct
Oceanian 0.19 Pct
Northeast_African 4.43 Pct
Sub-Saharan 87.58 Pct
    

Admix Results (sorted):

# Population Percent
1 Sub-Saharan 87.58
2 Northeast_African 4.43
3 North_Atlantic 2.47
4 Baltic 2.44
5 East_Med 0.79
6 West_Med 0.72
7 Red_Sea 0.7
8 South_Asian 0.35
9 East_Asian 0.23
10 Oceanian 0.19
11 Amerindian 0.11

Single Population Sharing:

# Population (source) Distance
1 Mandenka 4.49
2 Yoruban 9.42
3 Bantu_S.W. 9.93
4 Bantu_S.E. 12.2
5 Biaka_Pygmy 20.85
6 Luhya 28.05
7 Bantu_N.E. 29.17
8 Mbuti_Pygmy 39.14
9 San 50.46
10 Sandawe 75.28
11 Sudanese 77.29
12 Ethiopian_Anuak 83.35
13 Maasai 84.16
14 Hadza 89.05
15 Mozabite_Berber 93.3
16 Tunisian 94.89
17 Algerian 95.11
18 Moroccan 97.19
19 Ethiopian_Gumuz 101.43
20 Egyptian 101.48

Mixed Mode Population Sharing:

# Primary Population (source) Secondary Population (source) Distance
1 92.2% Yoruban + 7.8% Hungarian @ 2.04
2 92.2% Yoruban + 7.8% East_German @ 2.09
3 92.2% Yoruban + 7.8% Austrian @ 2.11
4 92.2% Yoruban + 7.8% Croatian @ 2.11
5 92.3% Yoruban + 7.7% South_Polish @ 2.16
6 92.1% Yoruban + 7.9% Moldavian @ 2.19
7 92.3% Yoruban + 7.7% Ukrainian_Lviv @ 2.21
8 92.3% Yoruban + 7.7% Ukrainian @ 2.21
9 92.3% Yoruban + 7.7% Polish @ 2.22
10 92.1% Yoruban + 7.9% Serbian @ 2.23
11 92.4% Yoruban + 7.6% North_Swedish @ 2.23
12 92.4% Yoruban + 7.6% Southwest_Finnish @ 2.26
13 92.3% Yoruban + 7.7% West_German @ 2.26
14 92.4% Yoruban + 7.6% North_German @ 2.29
15 92.4% Yoruban + 7.6% Southwest_Russian @ 2.33
16 92.4% Yoruban + 7.6% Swedish @ 2.33
17 92.3% Yoruban + 7.7% South_Dutch @ 2.33
18 92.4% Yoruban + 7.6% Belorussian @ 2.34
19 92.4% Yoruban + 7.6% Estonian_Polish @ 2.34
20 92.4% Yoruban + 7.6% Russian_Smolensk @ 2.35

K13 Oracle

Admix Results (sorted):

# Population Percent
1 Sub-Saharan 87.58
2 Northeast_African 4.43
3 North_Atlantic 2.47
4 Baltic 2.44

——————————–

Least-squares method.

Using 1 population approximation:
1 Mandenka @ 4.556562
2 Yoruban @ 8.533939
3 Yoruban @ 8.533939
4 Bantu_S.W. @ 9.484799
5 Bantu_S.E. @ 11.514960
6 Biaka_Pygmy @ 19.308048
7 Luhya @ 25.692616
8 Bantu_N.E. @ 26.654455
9 Mbuti_Pygmy @ 35.786072
10 San @ 45.899738
11 Sandawe @ 67.810410
12 Sudanese @ 70.184052
13 Ethiopian_Anuak @ 75.648659
14 Maasai @ 75.804718
15 Hadza @ 80.457329
16 Mozabite_Berber @ 85.015228
17 Algerian @ 86.627869
18 Tunisian @ 86.647331
19 Moroccan @ 88.373459
20 Ethiopian_Gumuz @ 91.855560

Using 2 populations approximation:
1 50% Mandenka +50% Mandenka @ 4.556562

Using 3 populations approximation:
1 50% Mandenka +25% Mandenka +25% Mandenka @ 4.556562

Using 4 populations approximation:
++++++++++++++++++++++++++
1 Mandenka + Mandenka + Mandenka + Mandenka @ 4.556562
2 Mandenka + Mandenka + Mandenka + Yoruban @ 4.782597
3 Mandenka + Mandenka + Mandenka + Yoruban @ 4.782597
4 Bantu_S.W. + Mandenka + Mandenka + Yoruban @ 5.087480
5 Bantu_S.W. + Mandenka + Mandenka + Yoruban @ 5.087480
6 Bantu_S.E. + Mandenka + Mandenka + Yoruban @ 5.221232
Biaka_Pygmy + Mandenka + Yoruban + Yoruban @ 5.687406
16 Biaka_Pygmy + Mandenka + Yoruban + Yoruban @ 5.687406
17 Bantu_S.E. + Mandenka + Mandenka + Mandenka @ 5.736868
18 Bantu_S.W. + Bantu_S.W. + Yoruban + Yoruban @ 5.755309
19 Bantu_S.W. + Bantu_S.W. + Yoruban + Yoruban @ 5.755309
20 Bantu_S.E. + Bantu_S.W. + Yoruban + Yoruban @ 5.843534

Senegal River Valley

Includes: Mandenka in Senegal and Gambian in Western Gambia

Mandinka Tribe – Senegal River Valley

Photo: Courtesy of www.tackk.com

Mende/Akan

Includes: Mende Sierra_Leone_MSL and Mende in Sierra Leone

 

Balkan

Includes: Albanian in Albania; Bulgarian in Bulgaria and Greek in (2 sites) Greece

 

Northwest European

Includes: Scottish Argyll_Bute_GBR and British in England; Icelandic in Iceland; Norwegian in Norway and Orcadian in Orkney Islands

Population
Nilo-Saharan 4.18 Pct
East-Africa2 3.12 Pct
Mbuti-Pygmy
East_Africa1 2.39 Pct
Khoi-San 1.28 Pct
West_Africa 72.44 Pct
Hadza 1.73 Pct
Biaka-Pygmy 8.99 Pct
North-Africa 3.72 Pct
Omotic 2.15 Pct

my african dna

Nilo-Saharan languages

The Nilo-Saharan languages are a proposed family of African languages spoken by some 50–60 million people, mainly in the upper parts of the Chari and Nile rivers, including historic Nubia, north of where the two tributaries of the Nile meet. The languages extend through 17 nations in the northern half of Africa: from Algeria to Benin in the west; from Libya to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in the centre; and from Egypt to Tanzania in the east.

As indicated by its hyphenated name, Nilo-Saharan is a family of the African interior, including the greater Nile basin and the central Sahara desert. Eight of its proposed constituent divisions (excluding KunamaKuliak and Songhay) are found in the modern two nations of Sudan and South Sudan, through which the Nile River flows.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nilo-Saharan_languages

Hadza Hadzabe

Hadza, numbering an estimated 1,300-1,500, are nomadic hunter-gatherers living in the rocky hills and arid valleys to the east and south-west of Lake Eyasi in northern Tanzania. They speak a language currently unrelatable to any other. They are acknowledged by neighbouring people to be the original inhabitants of the area. Hadza social structures are communal and egalitarian, with no system of chiefs and strong obligations to share resources, particularly food. Hadza reliance on hunting and gathering remains high. Adequate supplies of fruits, berries and tubers, as well as abundant game, make this way of life nutritionally adequate and ecologically sustainable.

WIKIPEDIA

Genetic Ancestry of Hadza and Sandawe Peoples Reveals Ancient Population Structure in Africa

The Hadza and Sandawe populations in present-day Tanzania speak languages containing click sounds and therefore thought to be distantly related to southern African Khoisan languages. We analyzed genome-wide genotype data for individuals sampled from the Hadza and Sandawe populations in the context of a global data set of 3,528 individuals from 163 ethno-linguistic groups. We found that Hadza and Sandawe individuals share ancestry distinct from and most closely related to Omotic ancestry; share Khoisan ancestry with populations such as ≠Khomani, Karretjie, and Ju/’hoansi in southern Africa; share Niger-Congo ancestry with populations such as Yoruba from Nigeria and Luhya from Kenya, consistent with migration associated with the Bantu Expansion; and share Cushitic ancestry with Somali, multiple Ethiopian populations, the Maasai population in Kenya, and the Nama population in Namibia. We detected evidence for low levels of Arabian, Nilo-Saharan, and Pygmy ancestries in a minority of individuals. Our results indicate that west Eurasian ancestry in eastern Africa is more precisely the Arabian parent of Cushitic ancestry. Relative to the Out-of-Africa migrations, Hadza ancestry emerged early whereas Sandawe ancestry emerged late.

The article also states

The Hadza and Sandawe populations in present-day Tanzania speak click languages thought to be distantly related to southern African Khoisan languages (Ehret 2000Güldemann and Vossen 2000Heine and Nurse 2000). (Throughout, we use “Khoe-San” to refer to people and “Khoisan” to refer to both language and ancestry, without implying identity.) Eastern and southern African hunter-gatherer groups have been genetically separated for at least 30,000 years (Tishkoff et al. 2007). Herding and cultivating Cushitic speakers reached northern Tanzania ∼4,000 years ago, followed by pastoralist Nilo-Saharan speakers, and then followed by agricultural Niger-Congo speakers ∼2,500 years ago (Newman 1995).

In the Hadza population, the distribution of Y chromosomes includes mostly B2 haplogroups, with a smaller number of E1b1a haplogroups, which are common in Niger-Congo-speaking populations, and E1b1b haplogroups, which are common in Cushitic populations (Tishkoff et al. 2007). In the Sandawe population, E1b1a and E1b1b haplogroups are more common, with lower frequencies of B2 and A3b2 haplogroups (Tishkoff et al. 2007). Using autosomal data, Tishkoff et al. (2009) concluded that the Hadza population had ∼72% ancestry distantly related to Khoisan and Pygmy ancestries, with ∼22% Niger-Congo ancestry and ∼6% Cushitic ancestry. Similarly, the Sandawe population had ∼73% ancestry distantly related to Khoisan and Pygmy ancestries, with ∼18% Niger-Congo ancestry and ∼9% Cushitic ancestry (Tishkoff et al. 2009). Henn et al. (2011) concluded that 1) the Hadza and Sandawe populations share ancestry with the South African ≠Khomani population but distinct from Pygmy ancestry, 2) the Hadza and Sandawe populations share substantial amounts of eastern African ancestry with the Maasai population in Kenya, 3) the Hadza and Sandawe populations share ancestry with Niger-Congo-speaking populations such as Yoruba from Nigeria and Luhya from Kenya, and 4) the Sandawe population shares a small amount of ancestry with Europeans (represented by Tuscans from Italy). Using whole-genome sequence data, Lachance et al. (2012)concluded that Khoisan-speaking populations diverged first, followed by divergence of Pygmies, and then followed by divergence of the ancestors of the Hadza and Sandawe populations. Pickrell et al. (2012) also inferred that the Hadza and Sandawe populations shared ancestry with Khoisan-speaking populations, with gene flow around 3,000 years ago of west Eurasian ancestry into eastern Africa (Pickrell et al. 2014).

The recent origin of modern humans in sub-Saharan Africa involves a basal divergence event such that one lineage includes Khoisan ancestry in south Africa; Pygmy ancestry in central Africa; Niger-Congo ancestry across west, east, and south Africa; and Cushitic, Nilo-Saharan, and Omotic ancestries in east Africa (Shriner et al. 2014). The other lineage includes Berber ancestry in north Africa; Indian and Kalash ancestries in south Asia; Chinese, Japanese, and southeast Asian ancestries in east Asia; Siberian ancestry in north Asia; Native American ancestry in the Americas; Melanesian ancestry in Oceania; southern and northern European ancestries; and Arabian and Levantine-Caucasian ancestries in the Middle East and the Caucasus (Shriner et al. 2014). These ancestries reflect shared history at a scale bigger than tribes or ethno-linguistic groups but smaller than continents. The divergence of ancestries is mainly due to random genetic drift following serial founder effects as modern humans peopled the world (Li et al. 2008). A notable exception is Cushitic ancestry, which did not form by a splitting event but rather by a mixing event between Arabian ancestry and Nilo-Saharan or Omotic ancestry (Shriner et al. 2016). We previously described integration of genotype data from 12 human diversity projects, yielding 3,528 unrelated individuals from around the world (Shriner et al. 2014)

Table 2

Pairwise Distances between Ancestries

Ancestry Arabian Berber Cushitic Eastern and Southern Bantu Eastern Pygmy Hadza Khoisan Nilo-Saharan Omotic Sandawe Western Niger-Congo Western Pygmy
Arabian 0 0.023 0.039 0.067 0.089 0.129 0.090 0.064 0.059 0.064 0.067 0.076
Berber 0.023 0 0.026 0.052 0.074 0.114 0.075 0.049 0.044 0.049 0.052 0.061
Cushitic 0.039 0.026 0 0.063 0.085 0.125 0.086 0.060 0.055 0.060 0.063 0.072
Eastern and Southern Bantu 0.067 0.052 0.063 0 0.033 0.099 0.034 0.017 0.039 0.043 0.008 0.020
Eastern Pygmy 0.089 0.074 0.085 0.033 0 0.122 0.028 0.039 0.062 0.064 0.033 0.022
Hadza 0.129 0.114 0.125 0.099 0.122 0 0.122 0.096 0.101 0.110 0.099 0.108
Khoisan 0.090 0.075 0.086 0.034 0.028 0.122 0 0.040 0.062 0.065 0.033 0.023
Nilo-Saharan 0.064 0.049 0.060 0.017 0.039 0.096 0.040 0 0.036 0.042 0.017 0.026
Omotic 0.059 0.044 0.055 0.039 0.062 0.101 0.062 0.036 0 0.044 0.039 0.048
Sandawe 0.064 0.049 0.060 0.043 0.064 0.110 0.065 0.042 0.044 0 0.043 0.051
Western Niger-Congo 0.067 0.052 0.063 0.008 0.033 0.099 0.033 0.017 0.039 0.043 0 0.020
Western Pygmy 0.076 0.061 0.072 0.020 0.022 0.108 0.023 0.026 0.048

https://academic.oup.com/gbe/article/10/3/875/4935243

Africa, Tanzania, Hadza tribe

Pygmies

The African Pygmies are divided into three roughly geographic groups:

They are notable for, and named for, their short stature(described as “pygmyism” in anthropological literature). They are assumed to be descended from the original Middle Stone Age expansion of anatomically modern humans to Central Africa, albeit substantially affected by later migrations from West Africa, from their first appearance in the historical record in the 19th century limited to a comparative small area within Central Africa, greatly decimated by the prehistoric Bantu expansion, and to the present time widely affected by enslavement and cannibalism at the hand of neighboring Bantu groups.[2]

  • Biaka Pygmy: The Aka or Bayaka are a nomadic Mbenga pygmy people. They live in southwestern Central African Republic and in northern Republic of the Congo. An ecologically diverse people, they occupy 11 different ecological zones of the Western Congo Basin. Wikipedia

The Congo Pygmy speak languages of the Niger–Congo and Central Sudanic


There has been significant intermixing between the Bantu and Pygmies.

There are at least a dozen Pygmy groups, sometimes unrelated to each other. They are grouped in three geographical categories:[7]

Origins North Africa 

African Pygmies are often assumed to be the direct descendants of the Middle Stone Age hunter-gatherer peoples of the central African rainforest. Genetic evidence for the deep separation of Congo Pygmies from the lineage of West Africans and East Africans, as well as admixture from archaic humans, was found in the 2010s.[9] The lineage of African Pygmies is strongly associated with mitochondrial (maternal line) haplogroup L1, with a divergence time between 170,000 and 100,000 years ago.

They were partially absorbed or displaced by later immigration of agricultural peoples of the Central Sudanic and Ubangian phyla beginning after about 5,500 years ago,[10] and, beginning about 3,500 years ago, by the Bantu, adopting their languages.[11]

North Africa

North Africa is a region encompassing the northern portion of the African continent. There is no singularly accepted scope for the region, and it is sometimes defined as stretching from the Atlantic shores of Morocco in the west, to Egypt‘s Suez Canal and the Red Sea in the east. Others limited it to the countries of AlgeriaMorocco, and Tunisia, a region that was known by the French during colonial times as “Afrique du Nord” and is known by Arabs as the Maghreb (“West”, The western part of Arab World). The most commonly accepted definition includes MoroccoAlgeriaTunisiaLibyaEgypt, and Sudan, the 6 countries that shape the top North of the African continent. Meanwhile, “North Africa”, particularly when used in the term North Africa and the Middle East, often refers only to the countries of the Maghreb and Libya. Egypt, being also part of the Middle East, is often considered separately, due to being both North African and Middle Eastern at the same time.

afr_asia_pol2

The Horn of Africa (SomaliGeeska AfrikaOromoGaaffaa AfriikaaAmharicየአፍሪካ ቀንድromanizedyäafrika qändTigrinyaቀርኒ ኣፍሪቃ}romanized: k’erinī afirīkaArabicالقرن الأفريقي‎, romanizedal-qarn al-‘afrīqī) (shortened to HOA) is a peninsula in Northeast Africa. It extends hundreds of kilometers into the Arabian Sea and lies along the southern side of the Gulf of Aden. The area is the easternmost projection of the African continent. Referred to in ancient and medieval times as the land of the Barbara and Habesha,[1][2][3] the Horn of Africa denotes the region containing the countries of DjiboutiEritreaEthiopia, and Somalia.[4][5][6][7]

Horn of Africa
Horn of Africa.png

See this – 1 minute clip on Somalian DNA result https://youtu.be/9FYZ7hvq00Y

Omotic languages 

The Omotic languages are group of languages spoken in southwestern Ethiopia. The Ge’ez scriptis used to write some of the Omotic languages, the Latin script for some others. They are fairly agglutinative and have complex tonal systems (for example, the Bench language). The languages have around 6.2 million speakers. The group is generally classified as belonging to the Afroasiatic language family, but this is disputed by some.

Omotic
Geographic
distribution
Ethiopia
Linguistic classification Afro-Asiatic

  • Omotic
Subdivisions
ISO 639-5 omv
Glottolog None
Omotic languages german.svg

Omotic languages:

Neighboring languages:

Omo Valley Ethiopia Tribes

 

Tsemai

Tsemai

The Tsemai, the dominant people of Weito village on the Konso-Jinka road, are regarded to be among the least known ethnic groups of Ethiopia. Estimated to be a total of some 5000 people, their territory extends along the western bank of the Weito River, known in Tsemai as the Dulaika River. They are mixed subsistence farmers who practice flood cultivation, with the major crops being sorghum and maize. They also rear livestock, especially cattle, and keep beehives for honey.

The Tsemai speak an Omotic language with an influence of Eastern Cushitic language that is closely related to the one spoken in Konso, which, according to oral tradition, is from where their founding chief Asasa originated. The present chief, who lives at the long-standing Tsemai capital of Ganda Bogolkila, is claimed to be the ninth in line after Asasa, suggesting that this migration might have happened between 150 and 250 years ago.

Omo Valley Ethiopia Tribes

The Cushitic Language

The Cushitic languages are a branch of the Afroasiatic language family. They are spoken primarily in the Horn of Africa (DjiboutiEritreaEthiopia and Somalia), as well as the Nile Valley(Sudan and Egypt), and parts of the African Great Lakes region (Tanzania and Kenya) by Cushitic peoples.

Cushitic
Geographic
distribution
Northeast Africa
Linguistic classification Afro-Asiatic

  • Cushitic
Proto-language Proto-Cushitic
Subdivisions
ISO 639-2 / 5 cus
Glottolog cush1243[1]
Cushitic languages.SVG

The Cushitic languages with the greatest number of total speakers are Oromo (25 million),[2] Somali (16.2 million),[3] Beja (3.2 million),[4] Sidamo (3 million),[5] and Afar (2 million).[6] Oromo is the working language of the Oromia Region in Ethiopia.[7] Somali is one of two official languages of Somalia, and as such is the only Cushitic language accorded official language status at the country level.[8] It also serves as a language of instruction in Djibouti,[9] and as the working language of the Somali Region in Ethiopia.[7] Beja, Afar, Blin and Saho, the languages of the Cushitic branch of Afroasiatic that are spoken in Eritrea, are languages of instruction in the Eritrean elementary school curriculum.[10] The constitution of Eritrea also recognizes the equality of all natively spoken languages.[11]Additionally, Afar is a language of instruction in Djibouti,[9] as well as the working language of the Afar Region in Ethiopia.[7]

The phylum was first designated as Cushiticaround 1858.[12] Historical linguistic analysis and archaeogenetics indicate that the languages spoken in the ancient Kerma culture of what is now southern Egypt and northern Sudan,[13][14] as well as those spoken in the Savanna Pastoral Neolithic culture of the Great Lakes region, likely belonged to the Cushitic branch of the Afroasiatic family.[15]

South Eastern Bantu

Bantu people are the speakers of Bantu languages, comprising several hundred indigenous ethnic groups in sub-Saharan Africa, spread over a vast area from Central Africa across the African Great Lakes to Southern Africa.[1] Linguistically, Bantu languages belong to the Southern Bantoid branch of Benue–Congo, one of the language families grouped within the Niger–Congo phylum.

 

africanlanguagefamilies-blench

My LEMBA BANTU DNA

Population
Caucaus_Parsia
Middle_East 2.42 Pct
Indian 0.90 Pct
South_and_West_European 1.56 Pct
Melanesian 0.28 Pct
Sub_Saharian 77.94 Pct
North_and_East_European 3.06 Pct
Arctic_Amerind
East_Asian
Paleo_African 13.79 Pct
Mesoamerican
North_Asian
    
# Population Percent
1 Sub_Saharian 77.94
2 Paleo_African 13.79
3 North_and_East_European 3.06
4 Middle_East 2.42
5 South_and_West_European 1.56
6 Indian 0.9
7 Melanesian 0.28
8 Mesoamerican 0.04


Single Population Sharing:

 

# Population (source) Distance
1 Lemba 6.29
2 Bantu 6.59
3 Yoruba 20.92
4 Mandenka 28.62
5 Ethiopian 62.28
6 Jew-Ethiopia 65.64
7 Biaka_Pygmies 65.99
8 Jew_Ethiopia 66.67
9 Lumbee 69.42
10 Moroccan 70.45
11 Mozabite 76.24
12 Yemen 79.17
13 Egyptian 83.48
14 Puerto-Rican 84.86
15 Jordanian 87.73
16 Australian 89.44
17 Costanoan 91.2
18 Miwok 91.48
19 Makrani 91.5
20 Mexican 91.85


Mixed Mode Population Sharing:

 

# Primary Population (source) Secondary Population (source) Distance
1 52% Lemba + 48% Bantu @ 4.25
2 95.4% Bantu + 4.6% Ire8 @ 4.7
3 95.8% Bantu + 4.2% Latvian @ 4.77
4 95.8% Bantu + 4.2% Lithuanian_V @ 4.78
5 95.8% Bantu + 4.2% Lithuanian @ 4.78
6 95.8% Bantu + 4.2% Belarusian @ 4.79
7 95.8% Bantu + 4.2% Estonian @ 4.79
8 95.8% Bantu + 4.2% Finnish @ 4.79
9 95.8% Bantu + 4.2% Finnish-South @ 4.79
10 95.8% Bantu + 4.2% Inkeri @ 4.8
11 95.8% Bantu + 4.2% Karelian @ 4.8
12 95.8% Bantu + 4.2% Vepsa @ 4.8
13 95.8% Bantu + 4.2% Russian_Center @ 4.8
14 95.8% Bantu + 4.2% Polish @ 4.81
15 95.7% Bantu + 4.3% Russian_North @ 4.81
16 95.7% Bantu + 4.3% Russian_V @ 4.81
17 95.8% Bantu + 4.2% Russian @ 4.81
18 95.9% Bantu + 4.1% Finnish-North @ 4.81
19 95.8% Bantu + 4.2% Polish_V @ 4.82
20 95.7% Bantu + 4.3% Moldavian @ 4.82

se-bantu-map1

The central tribes of the northeastern Bantu: (The Kikuyu, including Embu, Meru, Mbere, Chuka, Mwimbi, Tharaka, and the Kamba of Kenya)

The raw data analysis breaks my South Eastern Bantu down to the tribes  N.E_Bantu

Kikuyu of Kenya. 

N.E Bantu are found in Kenya North East Congo Tanzania Ethiopia and Somalia

East African Tribes – Kenya

Photo: Courtesy of www.prezi.com

PHOTO: COURTESY OF WWW.PREZI.COM

 

Includes: Bantu, Kikuyu, Luhya, Luo and Masai, Webuye, Kinyawa; Datog in Tanzania
Confirmed: Luhya and Bantu tribe, Kenya
https://www.dopecausewesaid.com/stylexlife/know-who-you-are-i-explored-genetic-dna-testing-part-1

 

 

Migrations of the Bantu-Speaking Peoples of the Eastern Kenya Highlands – Cambridge University Press
by JF Munro · 1967 · Cited by 22 · Related articles
It is a common assertion that the various groups of peoples comprising the north-eastern Bantu arrived in the general area of their present home- lands in eastern Kenya and northern Tanganyika after a dispersal.

Bantu Languages

Bantu languages derive from a Proto-Bantu language, estimated to have been spoken about 4,000 to 3,000 years ago in West/Central Africa (the area of modern-day Cameroon). They were supposedly spread across Central, Eastern and Southern Africa in the Bantu expansion, a rapid succession of migrations during the 1st millennium BC,[10] in one wave moving across the Congo basin towards East Africa, in another moving south along the African coast and the Congo River system towards Angola.[11]

The geographical origin of the Bantu expansion is somewhat open to debate. Two main scenarios are proposed, an early expansion to Central Africa, and a single origin of the migration radiating from there, or an early separation into an eastward and a southward wave of migration. [12] Genetic analysis shows a significant clustering of Bantu peoples by region, suggesting admixture from local populations, with the Eastern Bantu forming a separate ancestral cluster, and the Southern Bantu (VendaXhosa) showing derivation from Western Bantu by Khoisan admixture and low levels of Eastern Bantu admixture.[13]

According to the early-split scenario described in the 1990s, the southward migration had reached the Central African rain forest by about 1500 BC, and the southern Savannahs by 500 BC, while the eastward migration reached the Great Lakes by 1000 BC, expanding further from there, as the rich environment supported a dense population. Movements by small groups to the southeast from the Great Lakes region were more rapid, with initial settlements widely dispersed near the coast and near rivers, due to comparatively harsh farming conditions in areas farther from water. Pioneering groups had reached modern KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa by about AD 300 along the coast, and the modern Northern Province (encompassed within the former province of the Transvaal) by AD 500.[14]

The Bantu peoples assimilated and/or displaced a number of earlier inhabitants that they came across, such as Pygmy and Khoisan populations in the centre and south, respectively. They also encountered some Afro-Asiatic outlier groups in the southeast (mainly Cushitic),[15][16] as well asNilo-Saharan (mainly Nilotic and Sudanic) groups. As cattle terminology in use amongst the few modern Bantu pastoralist groups suggests, the Bantu migrants would acquire cattle from their new Cushitic neighbors. Linguistic evidence also indicates that Bantus likely borrowed the custom of milking cattle directly from Cushitic peoples in the area.[17] Later interactions between Bantu and Cushitic peoples resulted in Bantu groups with significant Cushitic ethnic admixture, such as the Tutsi of the African Great Lakes region; and culturo-linguistic influences, such as the Herero herdsmen of southern Africa.[18][19]

See below from https://oxfordre.com/africanhistory/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780190277734.001.0001/acrefore-9780190277734-e-191

The “Bantu Expansion” is the term commonly used to refer to the initial spread of the Bantu languages and the communities speaking them over large parts of Central, Eastern, and Southern Africa. Compared to similar expansions of languages and peoples that occurred in other parts of the world during the Holocene, this dispersal stands out in three regards: its vastness, its rapidness, and its predominantly longitudinal orientation.

Leaving Bantu speakers in the diaspora out of consideration, the Bantu language family stretches today between Cameroon’s South-West region (4°8’N and 9°14’E) in the North-West, southern Somalia’s Barawe (Brava) area (1°6’N and 44°1’E) in the North-East, and Cape Agulhas (34°48’S and 20°E), the continent’s southernmost tip in South Africa’s Western Cape province. This more or less contiguous distribution area crosscuts no fewer than twenty-three present-day countries on the African mainland. In alphabetical order, these are Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Congo-Brazzaville, Congo-Kinshasa, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Somalia, South Africa, Southern Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. In some of these countries, such as Burundi, Malawi, and Rwanda, Bantu languages are the only indigenous African languages. In others, situated in the northern and southern borderlands, other African language families are also present. In still others, such as the Central African Republic, Southern Sudan, and Somalia, Bantu languages are very marginal, not to say near to non-existent. Long-standing Bantu speech communities are also found on the islands of Bioko (part of Equatorial Guinea), Mayotte (an overseas department of France), and the Comoros.1 A variety of Southern Swahili—thus Bantu—is spoken on the small island of Nosse-Be, off the northwest coast of Madagascar, with another pocket farther down the west coast of the island.2

The Bantu Expansion

Figure 1. Map of Bantu expansion. Courtesy of Moritz Zauleck.

In sum, Bantu is the prevalent language family in Central, Eastern, and Southern Africa. The remainder of the Niger-Congo phylum, also known as Atlantic-Congo, prevails in sub-Saharan Western Africa, but has a distribution area which represents no more than a third to a half of the Bantu area. Due to the massiveness of its Bantu branch, Niger-Congo is by far Africa’s biggest language phylum, i.e., a grouping of related languages that is considered to be larger than a family. One in three Africans would speak one or more Bantu languages. A recent study estimates the current-day Bantu speakers at about 310 million.3 According to Ethnologue, the number of Bantu languages today is 556.4

The vastness of the Bantu language family is all the more remarkable if one reckons that its time depth is rather shallow. While the Niger-Congo phylum has an estimated age of 10,000 to 12,000 years, its low-level Bantu offshoot is believed to be no older than 4,000 to 5,000 years.5 It would have gradually split off from its closest South-Bantoid relatives in the borderland straddling South-Eastern Nigeria and Western Cameroon, an area of high linguistic diversity within the Bantoid subgroup of Niger-Congo’s Benue-Congo branch. The Bantu homeland has been situated there—quite unanimously—since the early 1970s.6 In conjunction with archaeological data, the internal diversity within the Bantu language family suggests that an initial phase of slow fragmentation and expansion over small distances was followed by a second phase of rapid large-scale dispersal.7

The divergence of the Bantu branch from its closest relatives was a long, steady, and local development in the Grassfields of North-Western Cameroon that lasted for more than 2,000 years, between 6,000–7,000 and 4,000–5,000 years ago. Similarly, the first southward expansions of Bantu speech communities were relatively slow. It is only about 3,500 to 3,000 years ago that the first Bantu speakers would have appeared in the region around the present-day capital of Yaoundé in Central Cameroon, some 200 km south of the Bantu homeland. Only from then on did the Bantu Expansion start to gain momentum.

About 2,500 years ago, Bantu-speaking societies are thought to have reached more or less simultaneously the Congo Basin, West Central Africa south of the forest, and the Great Lakes Region of Eastern Africa. By the first centuries ce already, their descendants would have made their first appearance in parts of what is today South Africa, i.e., somewhat less than 2,000 years ago. In other words, the embryonic stage of local Bantu divergence in the Cameroonian Grassfields region and the first southward spread to the Yaoundé region took twice as long, at the very least, than the subsequent expansion of Bantu languages and their speakers to the southern end of their current-day distribution area. In less than two millennia they bridged the distance—more than 4,000 km as the crow flies—between Central Cameroon and South Africa.

1 = 2000–1500 BC origin
2 = ca. 1500 BC first migrations
2.a = Eastern Bantu, 2.b = Western Bantu
3 = 1000–500 BC Urewe nucleus of Eastern Bantu
47 = southward advance
9 = 500 BC–0 Congo nucleus
10 = 0–1000 AD last phase[7][8][9]
# Population (source) Distance
1 N.E_Bantu 4.58
2 Gambian 5.72
3 Mandinka 6.07
4 Mende 7.2
5 Esan 7.92
6 Yoruba 8.15
7 African_American 17.31
8 Kikuyu 19.23
9 Maasai 34.72
10 Somali 58.01
11 Ethiopian 69.45
12 Algerian 99.14
13 Moroccan 99.42
14 Tunisian 99.91
15 Yemeni 102.49
16 Egyptian 108.33
17 Syrian 111.49
18 Jordanian 111.5
19 Uzbek 112.05
20 Hazara 113

Mixed Mode Population Sharing:

# Primary Population (source) Secondary Population (source) Distance
1 93.8% Esan + 6.2% Belarusian @ 0.31
2 93.6% Yoruba + 6.4% Belarusian @ 0.34
3 94.4% Mende + 5.6% Lithuanian @ 0.36
4 93.6% Yoruba + 6.4% Ukrainian @ 0.38
5 93.9% Esan + 6.1% Lithuanian @ 0.42
6 93.8% Esan + 6.2% Estonian @ 0.44
7 93.7% Esan + 6.3% Ukrainian @ 0.44
8 93.6% Yoruba + 6.4% Norwegian @ 0.49
9 94.4% Mende + 5.6% Estonian @ 0.5
10 93.8% Esan + 6.2% Norwegian @ 0.5
11 93.7% Yoruba + 6.3% Lithuanian @ 0.52
12 93.7% Yoruba + 6.3% Estonian @ 0.53
13 94.3% Mende + 5.7% Belarusian @ 0.54
14 93.8% Esan + 6.2% Icelandic @ 0.56
15 93.7% Yoruba + 6.3% Icelandic @ 0.56
16 93.8% Esan + 6.2% Finnish @ 0.56
17 93.8% Esan + 6.2% Russian @ 0.58
18 93.5% Yoruba + 6.5% Mordovian @ 0.58
19 93.6% Yoruba + 6.4% Scottish_West @ 0.6
20 93.7% Esan + 6.3% Mordovian @ 0.61

Below shows my  Palestinian and Western Semitic Asian DNA

EB4566

Western Semitic DNA from my Palestinian Hausa Dogon in Mali and Senegal and Akan Igbo and Eastern Bantu DNA. This DNA is found in Jordan Palestine Yemen and in Ethiopian and North and East African Jews.

HX2171525_EB4566

Population
Nilo_Saharan 1.47 Pct
Ubangian_Congo 1.93 Pct
W_Benue_Congo 58.89 Pct
Eastern_HG 2.17 Pct
E_Benue_Congo 25.56 Pct
Omotic 2.47 Pct
Southern_HG 2.39 Pct
Western_Semitic 5.12 Pct
Semitic
/sɪˈmɪtɪk/
adjective
  1. 1.
    relating to or denoting a family of languages that includes Hebrew, Arabic, and Aramaic and certain ancient languages such as Phoenician and Akkadian, constituting the main subgroup of the Afro-Asiatic family.
  2. 2.
    relating to the peoples who speak Semitic languages, especially Hebrew and Arabic.
The Semitic languages are a branch of the Afroasiatic language family originating in the Middle East that are spoken by more than 330 million people across much of Western Asia, North Africa and the Horn of Africa, as well as in often large immigrant and expatriate communities in North America, Europe and Australia. Wikipedia
Proto-language: Proto-Semitic
Linguistic classification: Afro-Asiatic: Semitic.
         220px-BayesianSemiticMap23871-004-22EDE938africa-map-ethnic-groups-7semitic-languages-of-ancient-world
SemitesSemitic people or Semitic cultures (from the biblical “Shem”, Hebrew: שם‎) was a term for an ethnic, cultural or racial group who speak or spoke the Semitic languages.

Semitic people – Wikipedia

8035. Shem 
Strong’s Concordance
Shem: “name,” oldest son of Noah

Original Word: שֵׁם
Part of Speech: Proper Name Masculine
Transliteration: Shem
Phonetic Spelling: (shame)
Definition: “name”, oldest son of Noah

NAS Exhaustive Concordance

Word Origin
from the same as shem
Definition
“name,” oldest son of Noah
NASB Translation
Shem (17).

 8034. shem 
Strong’s Concordance
shem: a name

Original Word: שֵׁם
Part of Speech: Noun Masculine
Transliteration: shem
Phonetic Spelling: (shame)
Definition: a name

NAS Exhaustive Concordance

Word Origin
of uncertain derivation
Definition
a name
NASB Translation
byword (1), defamed* (1), defames* (1), fame (8), famous (3), famous* (1), memorial (1), Name (3), name (654), name’s (11), name* (4), named (7), named* (66), names (80), renown (6), renowned (1), report (1), repute (1), same names (1).

52c3a8580db8c1c1503667f57ccd8aed--tree-drawings-christian-resources

See below  my Ancient asian DNA

Using 1 population approximation:
1 Gambian @ 4.575696
Esan @ 7.768073
Yoruba @ 7.768073
4 Mota @ 12.071078
5 Hadza @ 13.417694
Masai @ 25.794815
7 Somali @ 46.685955
8 Moroccan @ 80.260406
9 Saharawi @ 81.614891
10 Algerian @ 83.698547
11 Yemeni @ 89.642319
12 Libyan @ 90.041283
13 Egyptian @ 93.023880
14 GoyetQ116 @ 97.088066
15 BedouinA @ 98.755363
16 Jordanian @ 101.344734
17 Syrian @ 102.231903
18 Palestinian @ 102.558189
19 Steppe_IA @ 104.329994
20 Jew_Libyan @ 104.358345

Admix Results (sorted):

# Population Percent
1 Sub_Saharan 93.13
2 West_European_Hunter_Gartherer 2.39
3 Natufian 1.95
4 Ancestral_North_Eurasian 1.76
5 Ancestral_South_Eurasian 0.76

my african dna

Admix Results (sorted):

# Population Percent
1 W_Africa 62.66
2 S_Africa 13.82
3 Biaka 10.03
4 E_Africa 5.47
5 Europe 3.73
6 NW_Africa 1.8
7 San 1.5
8 SW_Asia 0.99

Single Population Sharing:

# Population (source) Distance
1 Bamoun 7.08
2 Kongo 7.38
3 Fang 8.17
4 Hausa 13.78
5 Kaba 14.01
6 Igbo 14.81
7 Yoruba 16.09
8 Brong 19.52
9 Luhya 22.11
10 Mada 23.01
11 Bantu_N.E. 25.06
12 Mandenka 25.98
13 Fulani 34.21
14 Bulala 40.28
15 Maasai 63.26
16 Morocco_S 64.66
17 Xhosa 68.69
18 HADZA 71.75
19 SANDAWE9 72.16
20 Algeria 72.26

Mixed Mode Population Sharing:

# Primary Population (source) Secondary Population (source) Distance
1 94.5% Bamoun + 5.5% North_Italian @ 4.15
2 93.8% Bamoun + 6.2% Morocco_Jews @ 4.18
3 94.4% Bamoun + 5.6% Tuscan @ 4.19
4 94% Bamoun + 6% North_African_Jews (Dodecad) @ 4.38
5 93.1% Bamoun + 6.9% North_African (Dodecad) @ 4.4
6 95.6% Bamoun + 4.4% French_Basque @ 4.53
7 93.7% Bamoun + 6.3% Egypt @ 4.74
8 93.2% Bamoun + 6.8% Algeria @ 4.76
9 93.9% Bamoun + 6.1% Morocco_N @ 4.79
10 93.7% Bamoun + 6.3% Egyptans @ 4.81
11 94.6% Bamoun + 5.4% Druze @ 4.81
12 93.3% Bamoun + 6.7% Libya @ 4.81
13 94.4% Bamoun + 5.6% Jordanians @ 4.89
14 93.6% Bamoun + 6.4% Ethiopians @ 4.89
15 93.7% Bamoun + 6.3% East_African (Dodecad) @ 4.91
16 93.7% Bamoun + 6.3% Ethiopian_Jews @ 4.92
17 93.4% Bamoun + 6.6% SANDAWE @ 4.94
18 93.5% Bamoun + 6.5% HADZA @ 5.08
19 92.7% Bamoun + 7.3% Maasai @ 5.08
20 93.9% Bamoun + 6.1% Moroccans @ 5.22
Population
Ancestral_North_Eurasian 1.76 Pct
Ancestral_South_Eurasian 0.76 Pct
East_Asian
West_European_Hunter_Gartherer 2.39 Pct
Natufian 1.95 Pct
Sub_Saharan 93.13 Pct

Admix Results (sorted):

# Population Percent
1 West-Africa 59.2
2 Eastern-Bantu 18.68
3 Biaka-Pygmy 8.54
4 Nilo-Saharan 4.41
5 French 4.27
6 Hadza 1.59
7 North-Africa 1.53
8 Khoi-San 0.96
9 Omotic 0.81

C

Below tribes I share DNA with

Single Population Sharing:

# Population (source) Distance
1 hausa 11.57
2 igbo 11.67
3 kaba 12.17
4 bamoun 12.89
5 yoruba 16.67
6 brong 19.36
7 kongo 19.59
8 fang 20.01
9 bambaran 21.82
10 mandenka 26.63
11 mada 28.92
12 dogon 30.36
13 bantusouthafrica 38.54
14 pedi 41.55
15 fulani 43.3
16 nguni 43.61
17 bantukenya 45.59
18 xhosa 45.81
19 sotho/tswana 47.76
20 hema 48.17

Mixed Mode Population Sharing:

# Primary Population (source) Secondary Population (source) Distance
1 57.5% fang + 42.5% mandenka @ 5.58
2 58.2% kongo + 41.8% mandenka @ 6.32
3 52.4% fang + 47.6% bambaran @ 6.34
4 61% fang + 39% dogon @ 6.44
5 90% hausa + 10% egyptans @ 6.81
6 90.2% hausa + 9.8% egypt @ 6.84
7 91.7% hausa + 8.3% biakapygmy @ 6.96
8 89.9% hausa + 10.1% libya @ 7.03
9 90.1% igbo + 9.9% egyptans @ 7.15
10 90.3% igbo + 9.7% egypt @ 7.18
11 91.8% igbo + 8.2% biakapygmy @ 7.34
12 90% igbo + 10% libya @ 7.38
13 51% brong + 49% fang @ 7.42
14 70.8% bamoun + 29.2% mandenka @ 7.42
15 89.2% hausa + 10.8% EtA @ 7.49
16 53.1% kongo + 46.9% bambaran @ 7.53
17 89.1% hausa + 10.9% EtT @ 7.57
18 89.1% hausa + 10.9% ethiopian-jews @ 7.57
19 89.2% igbo + 10.8% EtA @ 7.63
20 89% igbo + 11% ethiopian-jews @ 7.67

_EB4566

Population
S-Indian
Baloch
Caucasian
NE-Euro 4.12 Pct
SE-Asian
Siberian
NE-Asian
Papuan
American
Beringian
Mediterranean 1.32 Pct
SW-Asian 0.50 Pct
San 0.94 Pct
E-African 3.32 Pct
Pygmy 3.11 Pct
W-African 86.69
      
  • Palaeo-Africans: Sub-Saharan African tribes including the San, Mbuti and Biaka Pygmy tribes; and
  • Neo-Africans: Sub-Saharan tribes including the Yoruba, Mandenka and Bantu-speaking tribes

Admix Results (sorted):

# Population Percent
1 Neo_African 55.95
2 Palaeo_African 29.44
3 East_African 8.99
4 West_European 2.52
5 Northwest_African 1.89
6 East_European 1.15
7 Northeast_Asian 0.07

Single Population Sharing:

# Population (source) Distance
1 Hausa (Henn) 4.28
2 Brong (Henn) 5.26
3 Kaba (Henn) 5.52
4 Igbo (Henn) 5.7
5 Bamoun (Henn) 6.63
6 Bambaran (Xing) 7.6
7 Kongo (Henn) 8
8 LWK (HapMap) 9.31
9 Fang (Henn) 10.02
10 Dogon (Xing) 10.05
11 Luhya (Henn) 10.87
12 Yoruba (Henn) 12.12
13 Luhya (Xing) 12.45
14 Mada (Henn) 12.89
15 ASW (HapMap) 14.24
16 Nguni (Xing) 14.61
17 Pedi (Xing) 15.79
18 YRI (HapMap) 16.47
19 Xhosa (Henn) 17.11
20 Yoruba (HGDP) 17.12

Mixed Mode Population Sharing:

# Primary Population (source) Secondary Population (source) Distance
1 95.9% Hausa (Henn) + 4.1% FIN (1000Genomes) @ 1.51
2 95.9% Hausa (Henn) + 4.1% Finnish (Dodecad) @ 1.57
3 78.1% Hausa (Henn) + 21.9% ASW (HapMap) @ 1.61
4 73.9% Brong (Henn) + 26.1% ASW (HapMap) @ 1.66
5 96.1% Hausa (Henn) + 3.9% Swedish (Dodecad) @ 1.66
6 95% Brong (Henn) + 5% FIN (1000Genomes) @ 1.7
7 96.2% Hausa (Henn) + 3.8% Norwegian (Dodecad) @ 1.72
8 95% Brong (Henn) + 5% Finnish (Dodecad) @ 1.77
9 96% Hausa (Henn) + 4% German (Dodecad) @ 1.8
10 96% Hausa (Henn) + 4% Argyll (1000 Genomes) @ 1.87
11 96% Hausa (Henn) + 4% N._European (Xing) @ 1.88
12 96.1% Hausa (Henn) + 3.9% Orkney (1000 Genomes) @ 1.89
13 96.1% Hausa (Henn) + 3.9% Orcadian (HGDP) @ 1.9
14 95.2% Brong (Henn) + 4.8% Swedish (Dodecad) @ 1.91
15 96.1% Hausa (Henn) + 3.9% Mixed_Germanic (Dodecad) @ 1.92
16 96% Hausa (Henn) + 4% CEU (HapMap) @ 1.92
17 95% Brong (Henn) + 5% German (Dodecad) @ 1.93
18 96.3% Hausa (Henn) + 3.7% Irish (Dodecad) @ 1.93
19 96.2% Hausa (Henn) + 3.8% British_Isles (Dodecad) @ 1.93
20 96.2% Hausa (Henn) + 3.8% Dutch (Dodecad) @ 1.95

Hausa

The Hausa (autonyms for singular: Bahaushe (m), Bahaushiya (f); plural: Hausawa and general: Hausaexonyms: Ausa; Francophonic spelling: Haoussa) are the largest ethnic group in Africa and the second largest language after Arabic in the Afroasiatic family of languages. The Hausa are a diverse but culturally homogeneous[citation needed] people based primarily in the Sahelian and the sparse savanna areas of southern Niger and northern Nigeria respectively, numbering over 70 million people with significant indegenized populations in CameroonCentral African RepublicRepublic of the CongoIvory CoastChadTogoGhanaSudanEritrea,[4] Equatorial GuineaGabonSenegal and the Gambia.[citation

Predominantly Hausa-speaking communities are scattered throughout West Africa and on the traditional Hajj route north and east traversing the Sahara, with an especially large population in and around the town of Agadez. Other Hausa have also moved to large coastal cities in the region such as LagosPort HarcourtAccraAbidjanBanjul and Cotonouas well as to parts of North Africa such as Libya over the course of the last 5,000 years. The Hausa, traditionally live in small villages as well as in precolonial towns and cities where they grow crops, raise livestock including cattleas well as engage in trade, both local and long distance across Africa. They speak the Hausa language, an Afro-Asiatic language of the Chadic group. The Hausa aristocracy had historically developed an equestrian based culture.[5] Still a status symbol of the traditional nobility in Hausa society, the horse still features in the Eid day celebrations, known as Ranar Sallah (in English: the Day of the Prayer).[6] Daura city is the cultural centre of the Hausa people. The town predates all the other major Hausa towns in tradition and culture.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hausa_people

Hausa Kingdoms

The Hausa Kingdom, also known as Hausaland,[1] was a collection of states started by the Hausa people, situated between the Niger River and Lake Chad (modern day northern Nigeria). Hausaland lay between the Western Sudanic kingdoms of Ancient Ghana and Mali and the Eastern Sudanic kingdoms of Kanem-Bornu. Hausaland took shape as a political and cultural region during the first millennium CE as a result of the westward expansion of Hausa peoples. They arrived to Hausaland when the terrain was converting from woodlands to savannah. They started cultivating grains, which led to a denser peasant population. They had a common language, laws, and customs. The Hausa were known for fishing, hunting, agriculture, salt-mining, and blacksmithing. By the 14th century Kano had become the most powerful city-state. Kano had become the base for the trans-Saharan trade in salt, cloth, leather, and grain. The Hausa oral history is reflected in the Bayajidda legend, which describes the adventures of the Baghdadi hero Bayajidda culmulating in the killing of the snake in the well of Daura and the marriage with the local queen Magajiya Daurama. According to the legend, the hero had a child with the queen, Bawo, and another child with the queen’s maid-servant, Karbagari.[2]

 

South Sudan white Nile

River_Nile_route

The White Nile (Arabicالنيل الأبيض‎ an-nīl al-‘abyaḍ) is a river in Africa, one of the two main tributaries of the Nile; the other is the Blue Nile. The name comes from colouring due to clay carried in the water.[2]

From the point at which the river enters South Sudan from Uganda the river goes under the name of “Mountain Nile”. From Lake No in South Sudan the river becomes the “White Nile” in its strictest sense, and so continues northwards into Sudanwhere it ends at its confluence with the Blue Nile.

Mountain Nile

From Nimule in South Sudan, close to the border with Uganda, the river becomes known as the “Mountain Nile” or “Baḥr al-Jabal” (also “Baḥr el-Jebel”, بحر الجبل), literally Mountain River” or “River of the Mountain”[13]. The Southern Sudanese state of Central Equatoria through which the river flows was known as Bahr al-Jabal until 2006.[14]

The southern stretch of the river encounters several rapids before reaching the Sudan plain and the vast swamp of the Sudd. It makes its way to Lake No, where it merges with the Bahr el Ghazaland there forms the White Nile.[15] An anabranch river called Bahr el Zeraf flows out of the Bahr al-Jabal at and flows through the Sudd, to eventually join the White Nile. This Mountain Nile cascades through narrow gorges and over a series of rapids that includes the Fula (Fola) Rapids.[citation needed]

The White and Blue Niles merge at Khartoum, the capital of Sudan.

White Nile proper

To some people, the White Nile starts at the confluence of the Mountain Nile with the Bahr el Ghazal at Lake No.[15]

The 120 kilometers of White Nile that flow east from Lake No to the mouth of the Sobat, are very gently sloping and hold many swamps and lagoons.[16]When in flood, the Sobat River tributary carries a large amount of sediment, adding greatly to the White Nile’s color.[17] From South Sudan’s second city Malakal the river runs slowly but swamp-free into Sudan and north to Khartoum. Downstream from Malakal lies Kodok, the site of the 1898 Fashoda Incident that marked an end to the Scramble for Africa.

In Sudan the river lends its name to the Sudanese state of White Nile, before merging with the larger Blue Nile at Khartoum, the capital of Sudan, and forming the River Nile.

The tribes

The Nilotic people of South Sudan—the AcholiAnyuakBariDinkaNuerShillukKaligi (Arabic Feroghe), and others—first entered South Sudan sometime before the 10th century coinciding with the fall of medieval Nubia. During the period from the 15th to the 19th centuries, tribal migrations, largely from the area of Bahr el Ghazal, brought the AnyuakDinkaNuer and Shilluk to their modern locations of both Bahr El Ghazal and Upper Nile Regions, while the Acholi and Bari settled in Equatoria. The AzandeMunduAvukaya and Baka, who entered South Sudan in the 16th century, established the region’s largest state of Equatoria Region.

The Dinka are the largest, Nuer the second largest, the Azande the third-largest and the Bari are the fourth-largest ethnic group in the country. They are found in the MaridiYambio, and Tombura districts in the tropical rainforestbelt of Western Equatoria, the Adio of Azande client in YeiCentral Equatoria and Western Bahr el Ghazal. In the 18th century, the Avungara sib rose to power over the rest of Azande society and this domination continued into the 20th century.[33] Geographical barriers, including the swamplands along the White Nileand the British preference for sending Christian missionaries to the southern regions, including its Closed District Ordinance of 1922 (see History of Anglo-Egyptian Sudan), helped to prevent the spread of Islam to the southerners, thus enabling them to retain their social and cultural heritage, as well as their political and religious institutions. The major reasons include the long history of British policy preference toward developing the Arab north and its ignoring the Black south. After Sudan’s first independent elections in 1958, the continued ignoring of the south by Khartoum(lack of schools, roads, bridges) led to uprisings, revolt, and the longest civil war on the continent.[34][35] As of 2012, peoples include Acholi, AnyuakAzandeBakaBalanda BviriBariBoyaDidingaDinkaJiyeKaligiKukuLotukaMundari, Murie, NiloticNuerShillukToposa and Zande.[36]

Slavery had been an institution of Sudanese life throughout history.[37] The slave trade in the south intensified in the 19th century, and continued after the British had suppressed slavery in much of sub-Saharan Africa. Annual Sudanese slave raids into non-Muslim territories resulted in the capture of countless thousands of southern Sudanese, and the destruction of the region’s stability and economy.[38]

Profile of John Garang

John Garang de Mabior led the Sudan People’s Liberation Army until his death in 2005.

The Azande have had good relations with the neighbors, namely the MoruMunduPöjulu, Avukaya, Baka and the small groups in Bahr el Ghazal, due to the expansionist policy of their king Gbudwe, in the 18th century. In the 19th century, the Azande fought the French, the Belgians and the Mahdists to maintain their independence. Egypt, under the rule of KhediveIsmail Pasha, first attempted to control the region in the 1870s, establishing the province of Equatoria in the southern portion. Egypt’s first governor was Samuel Baker, commissioned in 1869, followed by Charles George Gordon in 1874 and by Emin Pasha in 1878.[39]

The Mahdist Revolt of the 1880s destabilized the nascent province, and Equatoria ceased to exist as an Egyptian outpost in 1889. Important settlements in Equatoria included LadoGondokoroDufile and Wadelai. European colonial maneuverings in the region came to a head in 1898, when the Fashoda Incident occurred at present-day Kodok; Britain and France almost went to war over the region.[39] In 1947, British hopes to join South Sudan with Uganda, as well as leaving Western Equatoria as part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, were dashed by the Rajaf Conference to unify North and South Sudan.[citation needed]

South Sudan has an estimated population of 8 million,[40] but, given the lack of a census in several decades, this estimate may be severely distorted. The economy is predominantly rural and relies chiefly on subsistence farming.[40] Around 2005, the economy began a transition from this rural dominance, and urban areas within South Sudan have seen extensive development