HISTORY OF KPAKPATSEWE ROYAL FAMILY

Sheikh Mustapha's Blog

Kpakpatsewe Royal Family is one of the early Ga-speaking Wo Sagba emigrants that arrived in the then Gold Coast from Tetetutu or Samè situated between two rivers located in the east beyond the Volta, and settled at Ayawaso with its capital on the hill of Okaikoi or Kplagon in the fourteenth century. The family came to prominence when Queen Dodi Akabi; the grand-daughter of the then King Wyete of Obutu and the mother of crown prince Okai Koi usurped the throne after the death of her husband King Mampong Okai in 1643 and ruled her subjects with iron hands.

In fact, so merciless, cruel and tyrannical was Dodi Akabi that she once ordered the young men in her dominion to execute all the elderly men to prevent any claimant to the throne competing for succession against her son; Okai Koi. Due to the fear of oppression and execution, this wicked…

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My jamaican slave ancestors Scott and Johnson

 

My maternal grandmother spoke of being from Clarendon jamaica. She was what we call red skin, a fair lady compared to my other side and it showed. She boasted of Indian heritage and had the hair to prove it. She was proud of being from Redhills. They were described as creole. These black people would have been more likely to be given less strenuous work possibly a house slave rather than a field slave. There was a mentality of remaining light and not mixing with darker people leftover from slavery because they were treated better. It appears that not only is my mother’s side mixed with Irish but the term Creole in Jamaica referred to people born in America and possibly mixed.

My grandmother and her family I now know was mixed with Polish/Russian and Spanish which would have given her an Asian look. I traced  my Polish side to a Coleman spelt Kolmann in Poland or Russia. The Polish Coleman was a war ship builder who travelled to America.

Below an advert for a Ben Coleman or Brown. Notice he is described as of yellow complexion and Spanish looking.

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See picture directly below of Spanish Africans owned by Russians.

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This side of my Jamaican family originated from St Thomas-in-the-East later moving to Clarendon.

map-of-clarendon-jamaica.jpg

Neighbouring towns to Clarendon include St Elizabeth St Ann

 

saint-thomas

 

The Scott family ethnicity

My grandmother said this part of the family had Indian ancestry. I expected to have Indian ancestry but I found it instead in my DNA matches. This part of my ancestry has Ivory Coast Ghana Nigeria Cameroon, Congo African south eastern Bantu Iberian Peninsula Finland/Russia Europe East Ireland in common.

Ethnicity

Regions: Benin/Togo, Mali, Great Britain, Cameroon/Congo, Ireland

Trace Regions: Africa Southeastern Bantu, Nigeria,,

Ethnicity

Regions: Ivory Coast/Ghana, Benin/Togo, Nigeria, Cameroon/Congo, Europe West, Mali

Trace Regions: Iberian Peninsula, Ireland, Native American, Europe East, Scandinavia, Africa Southeastern Bantu, Africa North

Ethnicity

Regions: Ivory Coast/Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroon/Congo, Africa Southeastern Bantu, Great Britain, Mali, Benin/Togo

Trace Regions: Iberian Peninsula, Senegal, Asia Central, Africa North, Middle East, Native American, Finland/Northwest Russia, Ireland

Ethnicity

Regions: Ireland, Africa Southeastern Bantu, Scandinavia, Great Britain, Europe West

Trace Regions: Cameroon/Congo, Iberian Peninsula, Europe East, Nigeria, Senegal, Italy/Greece, Asia South

Ethnicity

Regions: Nigeria, Ivory Coast/Ghana, Great Britain, Senegal, Mali, Africa South-Central Hunter-Gatherers

Trace Regions: Ireland, Polynesia, Asia Central, Asia East, Finland/Northwest Russia, Europe West, Scandinavia, Native American, Cameroon/Congo, Africa Southeastern Bantu

Ethnicity

Regions: Ivory Coast/Ghana, Benin/Togo, Nigeria, Cameroon/Congo, Europe West, Mali

Trace Regions: Iberian Peninsula, Ireland, Native American, Europe East, Scandinavia, Africa Southeastern Bantu, Africa North

Family Connections Scott’s Johnson Gordon Pérez cole watt Watson Burton Fuller Bent

The European Johnson DNA matches I have

Ethnicity

Regions: Great Britain, Scandinavia, Ireland, Europe West, Caucasus

Trace Regions: Iberian Peninsula, Asia Central, Europe East, Finland/Northwest Russia

The black Johnson ancestry matches below

Ethnicity

Regions: Ivory Coast/Ghana, Nigeria, Benin/Togo

Trace Regions: Senegal, Iberian Peninsula, Ireland, Scandinavia, Africa Southeastern Bantu, Great Britain, Cameroon/Congo, Melanesia, Mali

Ethnicity

Regions: Ivory Coast/Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroon/Congo, Africa Southeastern Bantu

Trace Regions: Senegal, Benin/Togo, Polynesia, Native American, Finland/Northwest Russia, Europe West, Africa South-Central Hunter-Gatherers, Asia Central

Ethnicity

Regions: Nigeria, Ivory Coast/Ghana, Cameroon/Congo, Senegal, Benin/Togo, Mali

Trace Regions: Ireland, Middle East, Polynesia, Africa Southeastern Bantu, Africa North, Africa South-Central Hunter-Gatherers

Ethnicity

Regions: Nigeria, Ivory Coast/Ghana, Mali, Senegal

Trace Regions: Africa Southeastern Bantu, Great Britain, Finland/Northwest Russia, Cameroon/Congo, Ireland, Europe West, Asia Central, Scandinavia, Iberian Peninsula, Africa South-Central Hunter-Gatherers, Native American

Ethnicity

 

Regions: Ivory Coast/Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal, Cameroon/Congo, Africa Southeastern Bantu, Great Britain

Trace Regions: Italy/Greece, Benin/Togo, Europe West, Europe East, Native American, Ireland, Polynesia, Africa South-Central Hunter-Gatherers, Scandinavia

Possible African Tribe connections

IGBO

Originating primarily from the Bight of Biafra in West Africa, Igbo people were taken in relatively high numbers to Jamaica as slaves, arriving after 1750. Besides Virginia, Jamaica was the second most common disembarkation point for slave ships arriving from Biafra.

They were spread on plantations around Montego Bay and Savanna-la-Mar. Igbo slaves resorted to resistance rather than revolt. Many of them committed suicide because they believed after death, they would return to their homeland.

Igbo slaves were also distinguished physically by their “yellow” skin tones. Today, in Jamaica, “red eboe” is used to describe people with light skin tones and African features. Igbo women were paired with Coromantee (Akan) men to subdue the men because of the belief that the women were bound to their first-born sons’ birthplace.

Jonkonnu, a parade held in Jamaica, is attributed to the Njoku Ji “yam-spirit cult”, Okonko and Ekpe of the Igbo. The Igbo also influenced language with actions such as “sucking-teeth” coming from the Igbo “ima osu” and “cutting-eye” from Igbo “iro anya”.

Words were added to Jamaican Patois when slaves were restricted from speaking their own languages. These Igbo words still exist in Jamaican vernacular, including words such as “unu” meaning “you (plural)”,”di” to be (in state of)”, which became “de”.

(Photo shows:an Igbo bride in Nigeria, with “red colouring similar to some Jamaicans).

Originating primarily from the Bight of Biafra in West Africa, Igbo people were taken in relatively high numbers to Jamaica as slaves, arriving after 1750. Besides Virginia, Jamaica was the second most common disembarkation point for slave ships arriving from Biafra.

They were spread on plantations around Montego Bay and Savanna-la-Mar. Igbo slaves resorted to resistance rather than revolt. Many of them committed suicide because they believed after death, they would return to their homeland.

Igbo slaves were also distinguished physically by their “yellow” skin tones. Today, in Jamaica, “red eboe” is used to describe people with light skin tones and African features. Igbo women were paired with Coromantee (Akan) men to subdue the men because of the belief that the women were bound to their first-born sons’ birthplace.

Jonkonnu, a parade held in Jamaica, is attributed to the Njoku Ji “yam-spirit cult”, Okonko and Ekpe of the Igbo. The Igbo also influenced language with actions such as “sucking-teeth” coming from the Igbo “ima osu” and “cutting-eye” from Igbo “iro anya”.

Words were added to Jamaican Patois when slaves were restricted from speaking their own languages. These Igbo words still exist in Jamaican vernacular, including words such as “unu” meaning “you (plural)”,”di” to be (in state of)”, which became “de”.

(Photo shows:an Igbo bride in Nigeria, with “red colouring similar to some Jamaicans). Originating primarily from the Bight of Biafra in West Africa, Igbo people were taken in relatively high numbers to Jamaica as slaves, arriving after 1750. Besides Virginia, Jamaica was the second most common disembarkation point for slave ships arriving from Biafra.

They were spread on plantations around Montego Bay and Savanna-la-Mar. Igbo slaves resorted to resistance rather than revolt. Many of them committed suicide because they believed after death, they would return to their homeland.

Igbo slaves were also distinguished physically by their “yellow” skin tones. Today, in Jamaica, “red eboe” is used to describe people with light skin tones and African features. Igbo women were paired with Coromantee (Akan) men to subdue the men because of the belief that the women were bound to their first-born sons’ birthplace.

Jonkonnu, a parade held in Jamaica, is attributed to the Njoku Ji “yam-spirit cult”, Okonko and Ekpe of the Igbo. The Igbo also influenced language with actions such as “sucking-teeth” coming from the Igbo “ima osu” and “cutting-eye” from Igbo “iro anya”.

Words were added to Jamaican Patois when slaves were restricted from speaking their own languages. These Igbo words still exist in Jamaican vernacular, including words such as “unu” meaning “you (plural)”,”di” to be (in state of)”, which became “de”.

(Photo shows:an Igbo bride in Nigeria, with “red colouring similar to some Jamaicans)

via faajihub.com

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Native to African

EWE

benin1-3

Ewe

They are particularly found in southern Togo (formerly French Togoland), Volta Region in southeastern Ghana (formerly British Togoland), and in southwestern parts of Benin. The Ewe region is sometimes referred to as the Ewe nation or Eʋedukɔ́ region (Togoland in colonial literature). Wikipedia

 

YORUBA

Yoruba2a

yorubaland_map-1

The will of John Scott Owner of Clarendon Park in Clarendon, Tower Hill in St Mary, and The Retreat St Thomas-in-the-East, Jamaica.

Scott, Honorable John heirs of, Retreat 234/ 30

 

1807 [EA] – 1811 [LA] → OWNER
1817 [EA] – 1823 [LA] → PREVIOUS OWNER
1809 [EA] – 1811 [LA] → OWNER
1800 [EA] – 1801 [LA] → OWNER

 

Addresses (1)

Garboldisham Hall, Garboldisham, Norfolk, East Anglia, England

Plotted in St Thomas-in-the-East as a sugar estate with a cattle mill and a windmill in James Robertson’s 1804 map of Jamaica.

To the King’s most excellent Majesty, this map of the island of Jamaica, constructed from actual surveys. . . (London, J. Robertson, 1804), based on Robertson’s survey of the county of Surrey which he compeleted in 1798.
1810
[Number of enslaved people] 261(Tot)
[Name] Retreat
[Stock] 157

Registered to Hon. John Scott.

Jamaica Almanac (1811) transcribed at http://www.jamaicanfamilysearch.com/Members/AL11STIE.htm. The almanac was based on the givings-in for 1810.

See below link

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/person/view/2146633646

 

saint-thomas

Golden Grove, Jamaica

St Thomas

List of Original Negroes on Golden Grove Estate, Living this 30th June 1790.

http://www.jamaicanfamilysearch.com/Members/Mslavegg.htm

In census records slaves are listed as being mainly either coromantee or Eboe on the Golden Grove Plantation

Golden Grove Sugar Factory. St. Thomas, Jamaica

by Julaine Schexnayder
(New Iberia, LA USA)

Golden Grove Sugar Factory. St. Thomas, Jamaica

For tourists and natives alike here is a photo of a beautiful place, off the beaten path. 

We have visited this area, in St. Thomas Parish in the southeast near the coast, several times in recent years. If it is unique and unusual places you are looking for, this is one of them.

Golden Grove, which now consists of a sugar plantation and factory, was established in 1734. The company employs a large number of workers seasonally and year round.

http://www.my-island-jamaica.com/golden-grove-sugar-factory-st-thomas-jamaica.html

A 2 hour audio Jamaican man explains African history before slavery below

https://youtu.be/WiAgA_xjVcU

See these records of St Elizabeth Plantation owners link below

Bennett, Frances Ann, Montrose 46/ 48

Bennett, Joseph, Spring Garden 30/ 16

Bennett, Montague deceased, Spice Grove 21/ 1

Bennett, Thomas, Spring Garden 21/ 2

Bent, Ann R., 7

Bent, Henry, Cherry Moia 6/ 5

Bent, John B., Cotton Tree Hill 8/ 20

Bent, Margaret Powell, 4

Bent, Nicholas, Tryall 13

Bent, Stephen, Mango Hill 3/ 6

Bent, Susanna E., 17

Brown, Charlotte, 5

Brown, Eleanor, 7

Bruce, John and Alexander, 14/ 3

Burt, Mary, 10

Burton, Catherine, 3/ 10

Burton, Frances T., 16

Burton, George William deceased, 5/ 40

Burton, John, Mount Providence 1/ 8

Burton, John, 7/ 14

Burton, Judith Ann, 7/ 20

Burton, Nicholas, 3

Burton, Nicholas, 9

Ebank, Caleb, 15/ 109

Ebanks, A. J. B. and M., 16/ 30

Ebanks, Ann M., 4/ 4

Ebanks, Anthony, 22/ 10

Ebanks, Augustus senior, 3/ 2

Ebanks, Benjamin, Castle Cary 2

Ebanks, Eliza G., 3/ 10

Ebanks, John, 9/ 27

Ebanks, John, 15/ 5

Ebanks, Margaret P., 4/ 1

Ebanks, Mary, 8

Ebanks, Richard, 7/ 28

Edwardes, John, 12/ 2

Edwardes, Margaret, Cool Retreat 5

Edwardes, Margaret, 13

Elliott, David, 2/ 5

Ellison, Henry, 3/ 2

Esson, Andrew, Pond Side 12/ 165

Exton, Margaret, 15/ 20

Facey, Thomas, 6/ 20

Facey, William, 5/ 10

Farquharson, Charles, Spring Vale 132/ 330

Fergusson, Robert, 10/ 20

Johnson, John, 8/ 2

Johnson, John, 1/ 1

Johnson, Samuel, 6/ 40

Johnson, William, 10

Scott, F. Hutchinson, 3/ 16

http://www.jamaicanfamilysearch.com/Members/Al20p13.htm

 

ST. THOMAS IN THE EAST, AND ST. DAVID

Custos Rotulorum, and Chief Judge, Hon. Simon Taylor, Esq.

Assistant judges and of the Quorum[Esquires]

*Hon. John Scott

*Hon. Henry Shirley

*K. Osborn

+Hon. C. Bryan

*Samuel Delpratt

Peter Robertson

Robert Logan

William Vick

*William Bryan

Robert Telfer

Thomas Leigh

John Kelly

+William Holgate

N. A. Grant

William Ker

Robert Ferguson

*William Milner

James Codrington

John Stewart

Thomas McKenzie

*John Carlyle

James Ouchterlony

Thomas Thomson

Samuel Thomson

Commissioners of the Supreme Court, James Ouchterlony, William Kerr, John Myrie, Esqs.

Clerk of the Peace and Court, Isaac Panton, Esq.

Clerk of the Vestry, F. F. Hill, Esq.

Coroner, William Vick, Esq.

Poundkeeper Morant-Bay, T. O’Brien Warren

Poundkeeper St. Davids, James Henderson

Collecting Constable St. Thomas in the East, John Noble

Collecting Constable St. David’s, J. Ouchterlony

http://www.jamaicanfamilysearch.com/Members/AL08List2.htm

MORANT DIVISION

Allen, Agnes, 8

Beckford, Honorable Nathaniel deceased, Spring Garden 184/ 37

Berwick, Newell, 14/ 2

Buchan, William, Church Hill 32

Champneys, Sir Thomas, Nutt’s River 264/ 27

Chapman, Jane, 6

Collard, J. M. deceased, Stoney Gut 85/ 42

Cope, John Freeman, Belvidere 351/ 113

Crean, Eleanor estate of, 6

Downie, Margaret, 10

Dunkerly, James, Greenwood Castle 4

Durham, Sarah, 4

Edwards, Ann, 12

Ellis, Richard, 10/ 4

Fergusson and Blair, Roselle 158/ 100

Fitch, Joseph estate of, York and Mount Prosperous 141/ 33

Fitzgerald, George, 15/ 1

Fleck, Henry, 18/ 2

Forbes, William, 8

Foulis, John, Arshdeal 34/ 18

Galloway, Rachel Reid, 18

Gildea, Margaret, 3

Gwynn, A. deceased, Middleton 169/ 11

Hamilton, Charlotte, 8

Hardie, Mary, 7/ 5

Hicks, John W., Pembroke Hall and Hicks’ Hall 193/ 13

Homan, Mary, 5

Hurst, Harriet, 4

Jackson, Joseph, 10

Jordan, Margaret, 9

Kennedy, Margaret, 24/ 4

Laurie, William Kennedy, Woodhall 149/ 2

Logan, Thomas, 28/ 4

Mallet, Mary Ann, 8

Marks, Elizabeth, 4

McCourtie, Thomas, 4/ 10

McGibbon, John deceased, Wilmington 33

McGregor, Alexander, 4

McGregor, Patrick, 3/ 1

Miles, Philip John, Golden Valley 185/ 23

Milne, Alexander, 5/ 2

McKay, Philip, 4/ 2

McKenzie, Cecilia, 6

McQueen, Neil, 4

Munro, Catherine, 6

O’Hagan, Michael, 6

Osborn, Kean, Montpelier 174

Paterson, Duncan D., Bannockburn 58/ 2

Pedley, John, Stanton 201/ 36

Poole, Nicholas W., 1/ 4

Porteous, James, Bonhill and Lochaber 55/ 22

Reallo, John N., 6

Reid, Rachael, 18

Riley, Ann, 6

Robertson, Margaret, 6

Scholar, Charles, 10/ 4

Scott, Charles, Hermitage 62/ 22

Scott, Honorable John heirs of, Retreat 234/ 30

Snodgrass, Hew deceased, 4/ 4

Spence, Hugh, 10/ 3

Stewart, John, 7

Stoddart, Ann, 18

Strathie, Mary, 10

Taylor, Ebenezer 134/ 8

Taylor, George Watson, Burrowfield 84/ 145

Taylor, Honorable Simon and Sir John heirs of, Lyssons 515/ 66

End

1790 ALMANAC

PUBLIC OFFICERS

Link to site for Jamaican family search 

Stephen Fuller Esq., Agent for the Island in Great Britain

William Duncan Esq., Agent General

Colonel E. M. Despard, Superintendent at the Bay of Honduras

John James, Esq., Commander of all the Maroons

James Mont. James, Esq., Superintendent of Trelawny Town

Peter Ingram Esq., Superintendent of Charles Town

Alexander Forbes, Esq., Superintendent of Accompong Town

Charles Douglas Esq., Superintendent of Moore Town

John Sp. Brodbelt, junior, Esq., Superintendent of Scott’s Hall Town

William Dunlop Esq., Notary Public

William Holgate Esq., Auditor General of the Revenue

William Smith Esq., Master of the Revels

John Clement Esq., Public Messenger

G. S. Sutherland Esq., Clerk of the Markets

John Edward Shackleford, Esq., Island Store Keeper

James Murry Esq., Acting ditto

Thomas Dancer, M.D., Botanist, and Physician to the Bath

Dr. Francis Rigby Brodbelt, Surgeon to the Spanish Town Gaol

Mr. Lawrence Hunter, Surgeon to the Kingston Gaol

Mr. Alexander Aikman, King’s Printer

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

William Dunlop Esq.,Secretary of the Island

Deputies

Kingston, Robert Boog Esq.

Savanna-la-Mar, George Murray Esq.

Port Antonio, James Charlton

Montego Bay, Donald Campbell

Lucea, Nathaniel Gray

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Eliphalet Fitch Esq.Receiver General

Deputies

Spanish Town, James Jones Esq.

Port Antonio, Mr. John Harris

Montego Bay, McLaurin Gillies

Lucea, Mr. William Brown

Savanna-la-Mar, George Murray Esq.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Alexander Robertson Esq.,Naval Officer

Deputies

Lucea, Donald Malcolm Esq.

Port Antonio, Mr. George Minot

Sav. la Mar, George Murray Esq.

Montego Bay, E. Montague Esq.


LIST OF SURVEYORS IN COMMISSION

[Surname/Given Name]

Brown Alexander

Burt Alexander

Burton Edward

Brydone ___

Clarke Robert

Campbell William

Cawley Stephen

Dalton Peter

Edgar Archibald

Ferguson James

Forbes Al.

Foss Matthew

Fraser William

Grant Patrick

Graham Robert

Gordon Robert

Gibson Robert

Kirkwood Robert

Leslie Robert

McDowal, J.

Munro Thomas

Morris Samuel

Murdoch John

Pierce William

Rome John

Ranken Alexander

Rosindell Robert

Smellie William

Sherriff Alexander

Syms James

Sutherland John

Schaw Edward

Savory Samuel

Speering Charles

Trought, Nicholas

Turnbull Archibald

Voce William

Whitaker John

Wilson Hugh

 

End

“EMANCIPATED” JAMAICANS – LANDLESS AND PENNILESS…& THE RISE OF FREE VILLAGES

beyondentertainmentblog

As we celebrate Emancipation Day in Jamaica to day I thought I would remind those the history of Emancipation and the rise of Free Villages. It is a story that shapes not only the country, but its people. It is who are are, fashioned by our fore-fathers who refused to raise a single nail on the plantations, removing themselves as far as possible from what represented a  symbol of murderous  crimes against humanity.

LANDLESS & PENNILESS
On August 1, 1834, “frees” slaves in Jamaica were required to undergo a transitional period as ‘apprentices’ before full emancipation. “Slave owners” were given monetary compensation of £6,161,927 for their loss of property in slaves. The slaves received no compensation.

Apprentices were obliged to work on the estates for 40.5 hours per week in exchange for food, clothing, and shelter, but not wages. The system was marred with abuses by the planters and…

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Ewe People of Ghana, Togo, Nigeria, Benin and Ivory Coast.

Africani Sankofa

Ewe People of Ghana, Togo, Nigeria , Benin and Ivory Coast.
Ewe People also known as Evê can be found in Ghana, Togo, Benin, some parts of Nigeria and Ivory Coast, they are part of the Gbe Speaking People and related to the Fon, Mina and Aja people. According to Professor Amenumey he claimed they originally came from Ketu in Dahomey Present day Benin which is considered as a Yoruba area, they were eventually forced which led to migration from eastward as a result of the expansions others claimed the Eweland extended from the mono river on the western border of Dahomey Present day Benin across Present day Togo and into the present day southeastern Ghana which is believed to be formely British Togoland as far as the volta river, from the south to the north and extend from the coast into the heavily forest hills. According to an Ewe…

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Calabar People of Nigeria.

Africani Sankofa

image

Calabar People of Nigeria.

Calabar People can be found in Nigeria , they are Efik ethnic group located in the cross river Southsouthern part of Present day Nigeria and they are part of the Niger- Congo family. According to the Oral history the word ” Calabar ” derived from the word Akwa Akpa from the Efik language it is said there was a town called Akwa Akpa, the British Colonists who came to Calabarland or Kalabarland referred them as Calabar which was mispelled, the neighbouring town of Ataba took over the name, they have town such as Akim, Ikot, Ansa, Ishie, Kasuk , Duke town, Henshaw town, Ikot omin, Obutong, Bakassi, Biase and AkamKpa which was their Original name until the arrival of Europeans they became known as Calabar. During Atlantic Slavery they were captured as slaves by British and Spanish by the 18th Century they were transported to USA…

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Transatlantic journey from West Africa to beyond