Tag Archives: Dispora

links to some Black History posts on this blog.

 

 

 

Click the links below to view the posts.

Think You Can’t Research Your African American Family History? Think Again.

Using DNA to find the common ancestor — The Genealogy Corner

Who do you think you are magazine link. Tracing ancestors worldwide

African ancestry with link to African ancestry DNA site

Analysing trans-atlantic DNA results

The Story in My DNA

My carribean african ancestry DNA

 

Ethnic Origins of Jamaican Runaway Slaves

Haitian DNA Results

 

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AFRICAN🌟 DIASPORA (NEVER🌍FORGET) ONLINE 💻 ENCYCLOPEDIA!AFRICAN DIASPORA (NEVERFORGET) ONLINE ENCYCLOPEDIA!

Historical black figures in Europe and beyond

Links to the slave databases available online

First World War records of service

 

AMER’ICAN, noun A native of America; originally applied to the aboriginals, or copper-colored races, found here by the Europeans. Link below

The slave population of the United States from 1815

In Our Cities: From Slavery to Real Estate Mogul, Biddy Mason Leaves Her Mark on Los Angeles

 

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Inspirational black historical figures and quotes

Harriet Ann Jacob’s incidents in the life of a slave girl

The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano

Olaudah Equiano – life on board – A slaves account

Who the Moors really were.

When Black Men Ruled the World: 8 Things The Moors Brought to Europe – Atlanta Black Star

 

Efik people

GA PEOPLE: GHANA`S TRIBE THAT HAS MAINTAINED ITS AFRICAN TRADITIONS AND CULTURE IN THE MIDST OF WESTERN INFLUENCE IN THE CAPITAL CITY,ACCRA.

Ga Naming patten

The tribe of Ga

The Igbo tribe

Igbo people in Jamaica

 

Stunning pictures of African tribes from “The African Way”

Benin trade and art

Rice production in Nigeria

Nigerian Results (Ancestry DNA)

Road tripping across Nigeria: A Photo Essay — The Five to Nine Traveller

Tracing Cameroon Roots

The Lemba Bantu tribe in South Africa

History And Legacy Of South Africa’s Legendary Warrior, Shaka Zulu. — African Paradise World

Sahel / Interior

PEOPLE OF THE WATER: THE LIBINZA OF THE ISLANDS OF THE NGIRI RIVER, DEMOCRATIC REPUPLIC OF THE CONGO – Part 2: THE WATER..

African ancestry with link to African ancestry DNA site

 

Israelite Tribes

The East African Israelites of Zanjiland

The Bantu Branch of ‘Africans’ are Hebrew Israelites PART I of II

History And Legacy Of Haile Selassie I — African Paradise World

THE YORUBA AND OTHER HEBREW ISRAELITES OF NIGERIA

The tribes Benjamin & Judah

THE HEBREW ISRAELITES AND THE TRANS-ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE CONNECTION

“BLACK HEBREW ISRAELITES “BY ANGELFIRE.COM

Black History Pt 3: The True Identity of the West African Slaves PT 3

Found Biblical heritage of Black Americans Historical Evidence They Are Hebrews ( New Videos Added )

The Igbo and Hebrew Jewish practises.

Exploration of The Hebrews descended from the tribe of GADExploration of The Hebrews descended from the tribe of GAD

Israel’s Covenant Renewal Deuteronomy

 

Developing a connection with your spirit

Spirituality: A focus on the soul “the shift in priorities allows us to embrace our spirituality in a more profound way”

English Bible History

Christianity’s African Roots

History of Judaism

Catholic Church Admits They Made the Change to the Sabbath

The Torah states to worship YHWH. In Hebrew God is associated with Baal and other false God.

So Early Christians Stole From Kamit/Kemet Now What? Pt. 1

“ANCIENT EGYPTIANS WROTE THE BIBLE” BY DR. KWAME NANTAMBU,KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

Metu Neter – Ma’at – 11 Laws of God

The Kemetic Religion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Think You Can’t Research Your African American Family History? Think Again.

Posted by Ancestry Team on November 3, 2015 in 
WebsiteBy Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Paul Rawlins, Editorial Manager at Ancestry

 

Reposted from https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2015/11/03/think-you-cant-research-your-african-american-family-history-think-again/

Censuses aren’t the only records that can help you find the names of your formerly enslaved ancestors. In most states, birth and death certificates didn’t become mandatory until the early 20th century. But death certificates and indexes, like the following entry from Georgia, often list the names of the deceased’s parents:

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Charlie Anthony died in 1925, well into the 20th century. His birth date is listed as 1869, but his parents, Lem Anthony and Louvenia Jones, would both have been born well before the end of the Civil War.

Wills and probates, emancipation and manumission papers, and slave schedules are other records that help you get back further into the 19th century. Ancestry also has a free guide to African American research that outlines additional sources and strategies. The main point is your family doesn’t stop—or begin, rather—at the 1870 census. Records may get thin, but don’t give up before you even search.

Finding Your Home in Africa with DNA

So what if you aren’t among the small percentage of people who find a census record that lists Africa as a birthplace for one of their ancestors? Remember, the slave trade was illegal starting in 1808, so most former slaves who were alive in 1870 would have been born in the United States. But even if you do find an ancestor who said they had been born in Africa, Africa is a very large continent, not a single country like France or England. And our ancestors mostly came from a variety of locations all along the west and west-central coasts of the continent. That’s where DNA testing comes in.

DNA testing will provide two different sets of results. The first is an ethnicity estimate, also known in genetic circles as “admixture,” which predicts where in Africa, Europe, and elsewhere your various ancestors originated over the last 500 years or so. (This test will also give you your percentage of Native American ancestry.) On average, Americans who have taken the AncestryDNA test and identify as black will have four different areas out of the nine identified from Africa appear in their ethnicity results. DNA testing may be the best way, and is often the only way, to trace your roots back to a specific area or people in Africa.

A DNA test will also compare your test results to the results of everybody else who has taken the test, looking for genetic matches, or “cousins.”

At the Tom Joyner Family Reunion, four members of the cast of the 1970s sitcom Good Times took an AncestryDNA test—including John Amos, who played Kunta Kinte on Roots—and are waiting for their results.

In African American Lives, we tested my friend Tom Joyner, and his results were quite fascinating: he was 62 percent sub-Saharan African, 35 percent European, and 3 percent Native American, while his y-DNA (his father’s paternal line) matched males living in Scandinavia and the United Kingdom, especially Ireland. Fully 35 percent of all African American males trace their paternal genetic ancestry to Europe, rather than to Africa.

My own results are also eye opening. Like Tom’s, my father’s paternal line traces straight to the United Kingdom, in fact to Ireland. And my admixture percentages are even more surprising: According to AncestryDNA, I’m 50 percent African and 48 percent European, with less than 1 percent Native American, which is a surprise to my cousins! My African genetic heritage breaks down among the following regions:

  • Cameroon/Congo 17%
  • Benin/Togo 13%
  • Ivory Coast/Ghana 8%
  • Nigeria 7%

Since these are all key areas in the slave trade, this result is not a surprise. All African Americans reflect in their genomes the great diversity of the points of origin of their African ancestors.

With scientific advances like DNA testing and new records coming online every day, there’s never been a better time for an African American to start uncovering the story of their own past. And judging from the hugs, screams, and high fives the Ancestry team got in Orlando, it’s never been more exciting, either.

Do you have a mystery in your own family tree? Or have you wondered what family history discoveries you could make with a DNA test? Send Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and his team of Ancestry experts your question at ask@ancestry.com.

See the world vital record link to start tracing your American ancestors.

http://www.worldvitalrecords.com/indexinfo.aspx?ix=ssdiall

Link to my other posts

Product of the African slave trade link to Black History posts