Tag Archives: Igbos in Jamaica

This is the original list of returned escaped slaves in Jamaica.

 Return of the ACCOMPONG Maroons 27TH OCTOBER 1831 CO 140/121

http://www.jamaicanfamilysearch.com/Members/MaroonsAccompong.htm

 

Please note this is only one list of escaped slaves and my ancestors were found on a 1809 census aswel ( quoted from memory the record is on one of my other posts) Nanny of the Maroons started the movement of runaway slaves and founded her own towns for them. Maroon Town and Accompong. You can visit my related posts by doing a search in my search bar. Some Maroons were deported to Freetown.

My family are listed. If you are Jamaicans American Haitian your family might be listed too.

OFFICERS

Lieutenant-colonel Andrew White

61

Lieutenant Robert Reid Peate

54

Captain James Rowe

61

Lieutenant Richard Rowe

30

Captain William Dennis Reid

55

Lieutenant John Reid

53

Captain James Dennis Foster

57

Lieutenant John Watson

43

 

PRIVATES

 

William Adlam

54

George Reid

34

John Adlam

22

Robert Hugh Reid

43

Samuel Adlam

18

Thomas Reid

35

Colin Adlam

18

George Roache

39

Charles Austen

44

Thomas Roache

40

Samuel Anderson

26

Samuel Roden

32

Joseph Barrett

26

Charles Rowe

56

Edward Barrett

22

Henry Rowe

35

William Brice

26

Billy Rowe

30

Frank Cross

36

James Rowe

29

John Cross

43

William Rowe (sambo)

40

Thomas Cross

44

Robert Salmon

33

Thomas Cross, jun.

19

Smallin Smith

26

Thomas Currie (mulatto)

23

Quao Smith

22

William Davis

54

Thomas Smith

37

Barnet Dennis (mulatto)

45

Joseph Smith

30

Joseph Dennis (sambo)

29

Barnet Smith

35

Rodger Reid Dennis

55

Cabina Smith

41

William Dowan (mulatto)

26

Alexander Shilletto

31

Alexander Faulkner

26

Thomas Stretch

23

Samuel Faulkner

28

James Stone

38

Matthew Farquharson

37

James Swaby

39

Antonio Flesharkey (quadroon)

21

Robert Virvin

54

John Griffith

56

John Webb

22

Thomas Holliday

26

Thomas White

31

James Haughton

36

John White

21

Charles George Ludwig (quadroon)

22

Robert White

19

Richard Miles

33

Billy Wright

25

Edward Peate

25

Robert Wright

34

Billy Peate

25

William Wright

31

Thomas Peate

24

Samuel Wright

25

John Peate

30

James Wright

19

Samuel Pight

36

Samuel Barrett

18

Lewis Pight

35

James Montague

18

Charles Quarrey

26

 

 

 

 

WOMEN

 

Fanny Austin

53

Ann Rowe

26

Nanny Austin

77

Ellen Rowe

28

Catherine Barrett

51

Bess Rowe

27

Bash Beat

51

Debby Rowe

19

Barbara Boucher

69

Grace Salmon

60

Charlotte Bookay (mulatto)

23

Jane Salmon

31

Bella Brice

23

Bess Salmon

30

Nancy Carr

43

Nancy Salmo [Salmon]

27

Mary Carr

41

Polly Salmon

26

Peggy Carr

37

Jenny Salmon

23

Catherine Cooper

59

Webb Salmon

23

Bella Crisp

36

Susanna Shaw

27

Sophy Currie (mulatto)

21

Bess Shannel (mulatto)

56

Dorothy Darling (sambo)

35

Phœbe Smith

68

Eliza Davis

38

Mary Stretch (mulatto)

25

Jane Dennis

30

Frances Stretch (mulatto)

26

Louisa Dennis

23

Janet Quarrey

20

Catherine Dockery (mulatto)

46

Bess Venhillin

62

Mary Dockery

70

Mary Walpole

36

Dido Falconer

36

Christiana White (sambo)

60

Mary Falconer

60

Elcey White

27

Juba Falconer

23

Manna White

26

Nelly Foster

50

Eliza Johnston White

26

Nancy Griffith

19

Amelia White

24

Mary Griffith

24

Elizabeth Wright

51

Julina Griffith

26

Suckey Wright

51

Dido Holliday

43

Nelly Wright

48

Leah Myers

19

Ann Wright

32

Julina Peate

23

Mary Wright, 1st

32

Eliza Quilman

23

Mary Wright, 2d

25

Leah Quarrey

26

Polly Wright

32

Jenny Reid

73

Susanna Wright

24

Suckey Reid

19

Enthy Wright

25

Nelly Reid

42

Maria Wright

23

Bessy Roache

49

Jane Finlayson Wright

26

Susanna Rowe

60

Grace Wright

25

Lucy Rowe

22

Debby Wright

21

Mary Rowe

36

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOYS

 

William Anderson

5

William Reid

6

Robert Barrett

16

Billy Pight

2

William Barrett

11

James Reid

3

William Banista

16

Alick Roden (mulatto)

4

John Collins

3

William Ricketts

6

James Collins

6

Alexander Russell (mulatto)

3

Robert Cunningham

2

Quao Rowe

18

Colin Cross

8

Thomas Rowe, two months

 

Henry Cross

4

William Rowe

2

William Crosley

7

John Rowe

16

Lewis Degan

16

Charles Samuel Salmon

3

William Dennis

15

Samuel Smith

2

Thomas Dennis

17

James Stone

8

Edward Dennis

11

James Swaby

9

Frederick Dennis

11

Robert Vidal

9

James Donald (quadroon)

14

Charles Watson

6

Robert Furguson

9

William Webb

16

William Furguson

8

Crawford White

15

John Griffith

6

David Shaw White

11

William Holliday

16

James White, 1st

10

John Holliday

2

James White, 2d

4

George Macquirk

5

Boohe Williams

13

George Augustus Maycharge (quadroon)

7

Charles Wright

11

Edward Miles

17

John Wright

10

William Pennycooke (mulatto)

2

Joseph Wright

2

Samuel Albert Pight

2

James Wright

4

Antonio Pight

8

Thomas Wright

 

Charles Pight

10

Quao Wright

2

Robert Peate

3

 

 

 

GIRLS

 

Jane Alexander

4

Jane McLachlan (quadroon)

12

Mary Barrett

11

Crissy Ogilvie (sambo)

15

Nelly Barrett

8

Sarah Palmer (mulatto)

15

Margaret Barrett

6

Kitty Peate

15

Eliza Cross

2

Molly Peate

15

Grace Cross

16

Nancy Peate

12

Sophia Cross

11

Nancy Pight (mulatto)

5

Dorothy Cross

13

Juba Pight, seven months

 

Isabella Cross

11

Mary Anderson, five ditto

 

Mary Cross

9

Sophia Doman, four ditto

 

Sabina Cross

8

Carolina Reid

10

Susanna Cross

10

Margaret Rowe, 1st

15

Rebecca Cross

6

Margaret Rowe, 2d

7

Cecilia Cross

3

Rosanna Rowe

7

Cuba Dennis

15

Elizabeth Russell

5

Bess Farquharson

6

Frances Watson Salmon

2

Agnes Farquharson

4

Polly Salmon

5

Phœbe Falconer (mulatto)

14

Mary Shaw

5

Venue Foster

2

Catherine Shokea

13

Agnes Foster

2

Rosanna Salmon (mulatto)

3

Susanna Flesharskey (quadroon)

15

Frances Stone

3

Lydia Griffith

14

Ann Stone

4

Charlotte Gordon (quadroon)

16

Caroline Jane Thompson

2

Ann Harris

5

Ellen Vervin

17

Jane Holliday

4

Elizabeth Vervin

15

Piercy Holliday

12

Beche Vervin

13

Sally Holliday

8

Sarah Vervin 1st

17

Jane Horton

3

Sarah Wright 2d

3

Nancy Hoffman (mulatto)

9

Susanna Wright

2

Fanny Macquirk

3

Sarah Wright 1st

17

Ann Horton

6

Diana Wright

12

Mary Miles

3

Kitty Wright

13

Isabella Miles

5

Mary Wright 1st

7

Isabella Ludwig

14

Mary Wright 2d

2

Beche Lerman

13

Nelly Wright

5

Caroline Jones

5

Phœbe Wright

10

 

SUPERANNUATED, 1

 

MAJOR James Roache

76

 

 

FROM OTHER TOWNS

 

 

MALES, 3

 

Robert Adlam

10

John Reid

13

Dicky Clerke [Clarke?]

18

 

 

 

FEMALES, 7

 

Ruthy Dennis

49

Fanny Reid

18

Elizabeth Quilman

24

Hannah Reid

13

Eliza Reid

23

Joan Reid

9

Lydia Reid

21

 

 

 

 

 

RESIDING OUT OF TOWN

 

MALES, 35

 

James Alego, Kingston

21

George Smith, Lucea

13

George Allen, Trelawny

10

Kennedy Smith, Ditto

11

Jeremiah Allen, ditto

8

Henry Smith, ditto

8

Allen, ditto

4

William Smith 1st, Westmoreland

37

Allen, ditto

2

William Smith 2d, Dry-Harbour

6

Richard Burrowes, Stoney-Hill

31

William Smith 3d, Lucea

2

Robert Creighton, Westmoreland

24

——–Smith, sambo, Lucea

6

Thomas Creighton, ditto

22

——–Wedderburn, Westmoreland

2

Joseph Creighton, Ditto

19

James White, ditto

10

Thomas Douglass, ditto

14

Robert White, ditto

2

William Fullerton, ditto

21

——–Wright, ditto

2

———–Fullerton, ditto

2

——–Wright, ditto

2

John Hewitt, Spanish-Town

37

Richard Wolf, ditto

11

William Humphries, St. James’s

55

William Wolf, ditto

9

Edward Tullough, Montego-Bay

2

——–Wolf, ditto

4

Robert Shannel, Spanish-Town

15

James Cunningham, Montego-Bay

2

Joseph Shannel, ditto

18

——–Haughton, Westmoreland

2

William Shannel, ditto

19

 

 

 

WOMEN, 36

 

Mary Allen, Kingston

20

Sarah Harrison, St. Elizabeth’s

6

Susanna Adlam, St. James’s

24

Susanna Harrison, ditto

4

Sarah Adlam, ditto

27

Ann Hinds, St. James’s

3

Mary Austin, Westmoreland

51

Bella Inniss, Dry-Harbour

27

Nancy Austin, Rio-Bueno

57

Elizabeth Murray, Falmouth

25

Eliza Clarke, Falmouth

20

Harriot Murray (quadroon), ditto

3

Betsey Clarke, St. James’s

23

Ann Matthewson, Trelawny

6

Jane McGibbon Clarke, ditto

24

Mary Price, Rio-Bueno

26

Eliza Creighton, St. Elizabeth’s

13

Sarah Price, ditto

27

Elizabeth Cross, St. James’s

20

Ann Pight, Trelawny

6

Ann Dennon, Lucea

8

Jane Reid, Westmoreland

24

Bess Fullerton (mulatto), Dry-Harbour

19

Polly Rowe, Falmouth

57

Kitty Fullerton, ditto

25

Hannah Smith, ditto

50

Jane Farquharson, St. James

 

Rachel Smith, ditto

28

Mary Farquharson, ditto

3

Mary Smith, ditto

25

Lucy Haughton, Westmoreland

24

Mary-Ann Tomlinson, Westmoreland

3

Peggy Haughton, ditto

27

Beneba Peate

2

Ann Holliday, Lucea

25

Jane Wannup, Stoney-Hill

60

 

 

 

 

NAMES OF SLAVES

 

MALES, 7

 

Billy Boskew, alias William Rowe to captain Rowe

29

James Foster, to estate of late maroon

41

Charles Reid, to ditto

10

Foster, alias Jacob Alves, to colonel Foster

6

Joe, to ditto

 

John Ogilvie (mulatto), to ditto

14

 

 

Solomon Herbs

2

 

FEMALES, 9

 

Betty, to captain Rowe

8

Dolly, alias Darley, to Molly Dockery

46

Olive, to ditto

33

Rachel, to ditto

47

Phillis 1st, to ditto

32

Betty Graham, to ditto

1

Phillis 2d, alias Elizabeth, to ditto

8

Bessy, to estate of the late colonel Foster

18

Chance, to Molly Dockery

12

 

 

 

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Nigerian Results (Ancestry DNA)

Source: Nigerian Results

If you are interested in the DNA of African’s in Dispora check out the link above or if you are interested in the slave trade and like me you are a descendant of one of those africans taken into slavery you must check out this blog  it is Fantastic.

Here is one of the discussions at https://tracingafricanroots.wordpress.com/ancestrydna/african-results/nigerian-results/

Can Nigerian ethnic groups be genetically distinguished?

***Figure 5.1 (click to enlarge)

NAIJA ETHNIC DIVERSITY

***Map 5.1 (click to enlarge)

2000px-Nigeria_linguistical_map_1979.svg

***Map 5.2 (click to enlarge)

For more ethnolinguistic maps scroll down to Nigeria on this page:

Nigeria_ethnic_v3

***

Obviously – as illustrated by the above maps – Nigeria is incredibly diverse and home to a great number of ethnic groups. According to a recent listing no less than 371 groups! But still it seems significant that atleast within the AncestryDNA format Nigerians from various backgrounds do share a great degree of genetic origins as described by the socalled “Nigeria” region. There is at least one important lesson we may take away from the Nigerian AncestryDNA results featured on this page. It seems inevitable that most ethnic groups within Nigeria will display close genetic affinity as a testimony of a great degree of shared origins. Sometimes due to relatively recent intermarriage but ultimately mostly to be traced back to ancient prehistory. I suppose knowing about these cross-ethnic connections and also having shared ancestry in common with people across borders could be an antidote for an overly “tribalistic” mindset. Judging from the results i have collected actually also within ethnic groups you are bound to see a great deal of individual variation correlated with geography, distinct subgroups and deep ancestry predating ethnogenesis. By no means it seems will there be any unique genetic “blueprint” for any given ethnic group.

This is a topic i intend to blog about in more detail as soon as i acquire a sufficient number of Nigerian AncestryDNA results with a representative ethnic distribution. For now i will just point out that based on my very preliminary findings and minimal sample size: it seems it is foremost the secondary regions which might give additional clues about Nigerian ethnicity. Especially their relative contributions as none of the AncestryDNA regions will be exclusive to any particular ethnic group. These clues will not per se be conclusive but rather indicative. We can verify these proportional tendencies from the above compliation picture of 4 Nigerian AncestryDNA results as well as chart 3.2:

  • The Yoruba are likely to score more pronounced “Benin/Togo” amounts on averagethan the Igbo
  • The Igbo in their turn are likely to score more pronounced “Cameroon/Congo”  scoreson average than the Yoruba
  • The Hausa/Fulani will in all likelyhood score much higher “Senegal” amounts than both the Yoruba and the Igbo on average
  • Obviously these are generalizing tendencies, there will always be individual variation. Also smaller ethnic groups such as the Edo and the Ijaw are likely to be more intermediate and hence more difficult to distinguish.

Actually in several scientific DNA papers it has already been established that ethnic groups within Africa can reliably be distinguished from each other as long as they are not neighbouring groups but rather geographically apart and preferably also belonging to different language families. It is important to stress that the basis for this distinction is not in some uniquely ethnic DNA markers which can only be found among one particular ethnicity but rather because of a distinctive proportional mix of ancestral components which results in separate clustering patterns. In fact this is also the foundation for the socalled Ethnicity Estimates on Ancestry.com. When limited to only 2 possible options it enables AncestryDNA to reliably predict – within a reasonable margin of error – if someone is Akan rather than Bakongo or make an accurate distinction between a person of Wolof descent versus a person of Igbo descent.

igbo2igbo-anambranaija-nr-1-regions-n15benintogo

Ethnic groups

While modern-day Nigeria is home to more than 250 ethnic groups, the four largest account for almost 70% of the population.

Hausa and Fulani
Yoruba
Igbo

The Hausa and Fulani

The Hausa people form one of the largest ethnic groups in West Africa. They are located primarily in northern Nigeria and southern Niger. The Hausa language is spoken as a first language by around 40 million people, more than any other language in sub-Saharan Africa. In Nigeria, the Hausa have integrated with the Fulani to the extent that the group is often referred to as Hausa-Fulani.

The Fulani are spread over many West African countries, including Senegal, Mali and Burkina Faso. Historically, the Fulani were nomads who kept cattle. They are also strongly linked to Islam; the Fulani led the jihads that helped establish the Sokoto Caliphate in Hausa lands during the 19th century. They are a minority population in each country they inhabit, with the exception of Guinea, where they represent 40% of the population. In Nigeria, the Hausa-Fulani account for about 30% of Nigeria’s population.

The Yoruba

The Yoruba live in southwestern Nigeria and the southern portion of neighboring Benin. They make up about 20% of Nigeria’s population. The Yoruba were greatly affected by the transatlantic slave trade; their territory was one of the most significant slave-exporting regions in Africa during the 1800s. The largest concentrations of Yoruba ended up in Cuba, Brazil and Trinidad. The Igbo and Yoruba peoples from the Bights of Benin and Biafra constituted roughly one-third of all enslaved Africans transported to the Americas.

The Igbo

The Igbo people are another large and influential ethnic group in Nigeria. With a population of about 30 million, they are found primarily in southeastern Nigeria, as well as Cameroon, Sierra Leone and Equatorial Guinea.

The transatlantic slave trade also had a massive impact on the Igbo. Many of those sold into slavery were kidnapped or captured as prisoners of war. Others were debtors or had been convicted of crimes. Several scholars assert that Igbo slaves were reputed to be especially rebellious; some would even commit suicide rather than endure enslavement. Elements of Igbo culture can still be seen in former New World colonies. For instance, Jamaican Creole uses the Igbo word for “you,” and a section of Belize City is named Eboe Town after its Igbo inhabitants. In the United States, a high concentration of slaves in Maryland and Virginia were Igbo, and they still constitute a large proportion of the African American population in the area.

Please note that genetic ethnicity estimates are based on individuals living in this region today. While a prediction of genetic ethnicity from this region suggests a connection to the groups occupying this location, it is not conclusive evidence of membership to any particular tribe or ethnic group.

http://www.ancestry.com

 

See this documentary on the Edo people of Nigeria below

https://youtu.be/xjK1jCYvKFU